The Vampire Theory: Elementary Children's Knowledge and Worries Related to AIDS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154753
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Vampire Theory: Elementary Children's Knowledge and Worries Related to AIDS
Abstract:
The Vampire Theory: Elementary Children's Knowledge and Worries Related to AIDS
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Kolar, Kathryn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Mississippi Medical Center
Title:Associate Professor and Chair
Objective: As of June 30, 2000, 8,804 cases of AIDS in children under age 13 years have been reported to the United States' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). More than 1900 diagnoses of HIV infection have been made in children in the same age group, and another 5,262 children aged 13-19 years have been diagnosed as well. Knowledge related to the disease process of AIDS, by allowing an individual to make informed choices, is a key step in the prevention of this infection and its sequella. The objective of this study was to describe upper elementary (9-11 year old) children's conceptual understanding, factual information, misinformation, and worries about AIDS as a basis for developing an individualized educational plan to assist children in gaining AIDS-related knowledge. Design: For this study, a cross-sectional descriptive design was used. Population/Sample/Setting: The target population for the study was an inner city neighborhood elementary school's fourth and fifth grade students. Their ages ranged from 9 to 11 years, with the majority in the 9-10 year age range. Thirty-nine participants comprised the sample. Concepts: The concepts examined by this descriptive study were the subjects' knowledge of various aspects of AIDS, their misperceptions of this disease, and their worries related to AIDS. Method: Following expedited IRB approval and informed consent from subjects and their parent/guardian, data were collected via questionnaire. The 39 participants verbally responded to the items read to them from an instrument developed for use with children that was presented in a standard survey format. The survey was comprised of two sections, and children's responses to items were recorded verbatim by the researchers. Additionally, appropriate demographic data were gathered. All data were analyzed for descriptive statistics and any correlation among survey findings and demographic data. Findings: Most subjects recognized that AIDS is a contagious disease that causes sickness and death, and that there is no cure. However, there were many misperceptions about the route of transmission/sources of AIDS infection, as well as manifestations of the illnesses associated with AIDS and the existence of a "cure" for the disease. Analysis of correlations is pending. Less than 20% of the sample reported obtaining AIDS-related information from school, while almost 30% received information from television. More than half had worries about AIDS, generally that they or a family member would contract the disease. Conclusion: Although subjects recognized that AIDS is a communicable disease with devastating effects, little was known about the nature of the disease, including its modes of transmission and the availability of curative treatment. Almost as many misperceptions as factual responses were given in these two areas of inquiry. Most AIDS-related information was obtained from family members and television. Implications: An AIDS education program should focus on transmission and prevention methods. This is most pertinent for risk reduction, yet was most misunderstood by this sample. Because much information about AIDS was obtained by the subjects through the media, age-appropriate video presentation of an AIDS education program could be accomplished in the school setting. Additional educational materials could be presented in a user-friendly game format, either via paper-and-pencil or computer program, so that printed information could be sent home for parental information/clarification. Further study of a larger, more diverse sample should be also undertaken.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Vampire Theory: Elementary Children's Knowledge and Worries Related to AIDSen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154753-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Vampire Theory: Elementary Children's Knowledge and Worries Related to AIDS</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kolar, Kathryn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Mississippi Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kkolar@son.umsmed.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: As of June 30, 2000, 8,804 cases of AIDS in children under age 13 years have been reported to the United States' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). More than 1900 diagnoses of HIV infection have been made in children in the same age group, and another 5,262 children aged 13-19 years have been diagnosed as well. Knowledge related to the disease process of AIDS, by allowing an individual to make informed choices, is a key step in the prevention of this infection and its sequella. The objective of this study was to describe upper elementary (9-11 year old) children's conceptual understanding, factual information, misinformation, and worries about AIDS as a basis for developing an individualized educational plan to assist children in gaining AIDS-related knowledge. Design: For this study, a cross-sectional descriptive design was used. Population/Sample/Setting: The target population for the study was an inner city neighborhood elementary school's fourth and fifth grade students. Their ages ranged from 9 to 11 years, with the majority in the 9-10 year age range. Thirty-nine participants comprised the sample. Concepts: The concepts examined by this descriptive study were the subjects' knowledge of various aspects of AIDS, their misperceptions of this disease, and their worries related to AIDS. Method: Following expedited IRB approval and informed consent from subjects and their parent/guardian, data were collected via questionnaire. The 39 participants verbally responded to the items read to them from an instrument developed for use with children that was presented in a standard survey format. The survey was comprised of two sections, and children's responses to items were recorded verbatim by the researchers. Additionally, appropriate demographic data were gathered. All data were analyzed for descriptive statistics and any correlation among survey findings and demographic data. Findings: Most subjects recognized that AIDS is a contagious disease that causes sickness and death, and that there is no cure. However, there were many misperceptions about the route of transmission/sources of AIDS infection, as well as manifestations of the illnesses associated with AIDS and the existence of a &quot;cure&quot; for the disease. Analysis of correlations is pending. Less than 20% of the sample reported obtaining AIDS-related information from school, while almost 30% received information from television. More than half had worries about AIDS, generally that they or a family member would contract the disease. Conclusion: Although subjects recognized that AIDS is a communicable disease with devastating effects, little was known about the nature of the disease, including its modes of transmission and the availability of curative treatment. Almost as many misperceptions as factual responses were given in these two areas of inquiry. Most AIDS-related information was obtained from family members and television. Implications: An AIDS education program should focus on transmission and prevention methods. This is most pertinent for risk reduction, yet was most misunderstood by this sample. Because much information about AIDS was obtained by the subjects through the media, age-appropriate video presentation of an AIDS education program could be accomplished in the school setting. Additional educational materials could be presented in a user-friendly game format, either via paper-and-pencil or computer program, so that printed information could be sent home for parental information/clarification. Further study of a larger, more diverse sample should be also undertaken.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:15:02Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:15:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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