Critical Care Nurses' Ability to Accurately Assess Subglottic Secretion Viscosity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154754
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Care Nurses' Ability to Accurately Assess Subglottic Secretion Viscosity
Abstract:
Critical Care Nurses' Ability to Accurately Assess Subglottic Secretion Viscosity
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:O'Neal, Pamela
P.I. Institution Name:Gordon College
Title:Division Chair and Assistant Professor
Objective: To identify the ability of critical care nurses to differentiate between three categories of subglottic secretion viscosity: watery, thick, and gel-like. Concept Studied: Critical care nurses are instrumental in maintaining patent airways of mechanically ventilated clients and implementing clinical interventions to efficiently and effectively remove secretions. The tenaciousness of subglottic secretions may require vigilant suctioning to optimize efficient removal. Design: A descriptive design was implemented. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Twenty-two nurses in a medical respiratory intensive care unit at a large teaching hospital were surveyed in this descriptive study to assess visual identification of subglottic secretions in a conical tube as thin (like water), thick, or gel-like (glob appearance) during March -May 2000. Methods: Critical care nurses observed subglottic secretions collected in a conical tube and identified the secretions as watery, thick, or gel-like. The subglottic secretions were transported to a lab, and viscosity was measured by identifying the transit time. Watery viscosity was defined as those secretions that had a transit time of 00.00.00-00.00.99 and appeared thin and ran like water. Thick secretions had a transit time of 00.01.00 - 00.99.00 seconds and appeared dense and viscid. Gel-like secretions had a transit time of greater than a minute (01.00.00) and appeared solidified and congealed. Findings. Subjects were primarily BSN prepared (68.2%), had been a nurse greater than five years (54.4%), and most (58.9%) had spent greater than 2 years in critical care. The nurses' description of the subglottic secretions were significantly correlated with the laboratory categorization (r=.803: p=.000). Conclusions: These results demonstrate that critical care nurses can clinically differentiate between thin, thick, and gel-like secretions. Implications: Critical care nurses in general are able to base their clinical actions of increasing suctioning pressure to remove viscous secretions on empirical evidence.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Care Nurses' Ability to Accurately Assess Subglottic Secretion Viscosityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154754-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Critical Care Nurses' Ability to Accurately Assess Subglottic Secretion Viscosity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">O'Neal, Pamela</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Gordon College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Division Chair and Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">poneal@mail.maconstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To identify the ability of critical care nurses to differentiate between three categories of subglottic secretion viscosity: watery, thick, and gel-like. Concept Studied: Critical care nurses are instrumental in maintaining patent airways of mechanically ventilated clients and implementing clinical interventions to efficiently and effectively remove secretions. The tenaciousness of subglottic secretions may require vigilant suctioning to optimize efficient removal. Design: A descriptive design was implemented. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Twenty-two nurses in a medical respiratory intensive care unit at a large teaching hospital were surveyed in this descriptive study to assess visual identification of subglottic secretions in a conical tube as thin (like water), thick, or gel-like (glob appearance) during March -May 2000. Methods: Critical care nurses observed subglottic secretions collected in a conical tube and identified the secretions as watery, thick, or gel-like. The subglottic secretions were transported to a lab, and viscosity was measured by identifying the transit time. Watery viscosity was defined as those secretions that had a transit time of 00.00.00-00.00.99 and appeared thin and ran like water. Thick secretions had a transit time of 00.01.00 - 00.99.00 seconds and appeared dense and viscid. Gel-like secretions had a transit time of greater than a minute (01.00.00) and appeared solidified and congealed. Findings. Subjects were primarily BSN prepared (68.2%), had been a nurse greater than five years (54.4%), and most (58.9%) had spent greater than 2 years in critical care. The nurses' description of the subglottic secretions were significantly correlated with the laboratory categorization (r=.803: p=.000). Conclusions: These results demonstrate that critical care nurses can clinically differentiate between thin, thick, and gel-like secretions. Implications: Critical care nurses in general are able to base their clinical actions of increasing suctioning pressure to remove viscous secretions on empirical evidence.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:15:05Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:15:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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