The Wheel of Faith: Intersections of Health, Illness, and Spiritualism for Northern Plains Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154757
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Wheel of Faith: Intersections of Health, Illness, and Spiritualism for Northern Plains Women
Abstract:
The Wheel of Faith: Intersections of Health, Illness, and Spiritualism for Northern Plains Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Davis, Ruth, DEd
P.I. Institution Name:Millersville University
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: To understand the meaning of health and illness among a group of women belonging to a Northern Plains Native American group, the Blackfeet tribe. Design: Phenomenology guided data collection and analysis to uncover the meaning of health and illness experiences for Blackfeet women. As the goal of phenomenology is to understand human experiences, women’s voices were elicited to evoke the importance of ceremonies, family customs, and traditions associated with health and illness. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Over the course of one year, network sampling was used to recruit fourteen Blackfeet women living on their reservation in Northwest Montana. Socio-economic status was substantially lower than that of the United States as a whole. Yet, educational attainment was remarkable, with all participants having completed at least a high school education. The women ranged in age from twenty-six to seventy-five years. Methods: Data was collected through audio-taped interviews. Questions were open-ended and probed three main categories of inquiry. These included childhood experiences, the use of traditional and non-traditional remedies, and elements of Blackfeet culture. Interviews were transcribed and then analyzed for thematic development. Findings: The category of spiritualism emerged through analysis of the data. Three major themes were identified. First, Christian and traditional Native American spiritual beliefs were consonantly held. Second, health and illness were rarely perceived as those precipitated by health behaviors, but rather are associated with spiritual intervention. Last, traditional treatment and Westernized medicine were not viewed as contradictory, but rather as complimentary. Conclusions: The study reveals pertinent new information regarding how one group of Northern Plains women find meaning in health and illness through spiritualism and traditional belief systems. Implications: Primary care providers need to approach health care with an understanding of traditional belief systems and how these can markedly influence treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Wheel of Faith: Intersections of Health, Illness, and Spiritualism for Northern Plains Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154757-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Wheel of Faith: Intersections of Health, Illness, and Spiritualism for Northern Plains Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Ruth, DEd</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Millersville University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">drruth8@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract"> Objective: To understand the meaning of health and illness among a group of women belonging to a Northern Plains Native American group, the Blackfeet tribe. Design: Phenomenology guided data collection and analysis to uncover the meaning of health and illness experiences for Blackfeet women. As the goal of phenomenology is to understand human experiences, women&rsquo;s voices were elicited to evoke the importance of ceremonies, family customs, and traditions associated with health and illness. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Over the course of one year, network sampling was used to recruit fourteen Blackfeet women living on their reservation in Northwest Montana. Socio-economic status was substantially lower than that of the United States as a whole. Yet, educational attainment was remarkable, with all participants having completed at least a high school education. The women ranged in age from twenty-six to seventy-five years. Methods: Data was collected through audio-taped interviews. Questions were open-ended and probed three main categories of inquiry. These included childhood experiences, the use of traditional and non-traditional remedies, and elements of Blackfeet culture. Interviews were transcribed and then analyzed for thematic development. Findings: The category of spiritualism emerged through analysis of the data. Three major themes were identified. First, Christian and traditional Native American spiritual beliefs were consonantly held. Second, health and illness were rarely perceived as those precipitated by health behaviors, but rather are associated with spiritual intervention. Last, traditional treatment and Westernized medicine were not viewed as contradictory, but rather as complimentary. Conclusions: The study reveals pertinent new information regarding how one group of Northern Plains women find meaning in health and illness through spiritualism and traditional belief systems. Implications: Primary care providers need to approach health care with an understanding of traditional belief systems and how these can markedly influence treatment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:15:13Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:15:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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