Dimensions of Violence in Patients Hospitalized for Gunshot Wound in Trauma Centers in Cape Town, South Africa

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154770
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Dimensions of Violence in Patients Hospitalized for Gunshot Wound in Trauma Centers in Cape Town, South Africa
Abstract:
Dimensions of Violence in Patients Hospitalized for Gunshot Wound in Trauma Centers in Cape Town, South Africa
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Sapnas, Kathryn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Miami
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Andy Nicol, Delawir Kahn
Objective: To gain an in-depth understanding of the dimensions of violence: context, circumstances, and motivations that occur in patients admitted to the hospital with firearm injuries and test the psychometric properties of the Attitudes Towards Guns and Violence Questionnaire AGVQ© (Shapiro et al., 1997).<P> Design: Prospective hospital-based study using survey research methods. <P> Sample: Cohort of patients (N= 138) admitted to Trauma Centers in Cape Town, South Africa admitted for gunshot wound(s). <P> Methods: Structured bedside interviews were conducted. Two instruments were interviewer administered. provided a respondent profile. The 23-item Attitudes Towards Guns and Violence Questionnaire AGVQ© (Shapiro et al., 1997) (Cronbach a =.88) was used to assess the dimensions of violence. <P> Findings: The respondents were predominantly male (n=118; 86%), 18-29 years (n=88; 64%), single (n=90;65%), had not completed high school and were unemployed (n=75; 54%). Twenty-five subjects (18%) reported gang membership and 33 (24%) respondents had been shot before. Less than half (n=61; 45%) of the subjects knew who shot them. The AGVQ© original four factor structure was replicated. Four scales with four items each were created. Scale reliability ranged from .71-.81. Factor 1 "Comfort with Aggression" items loaded from .69 to .82; Factor 2 "Power/Safety" items loaded from .71 to.75; Factor 3 "Aggressive Response to Shame" items loaded from .71 to.77; and Factor 4 "Excitement" items loaded from .63-.81.<P> Conclusions: The characteristics of respondents in this study mirror those of trauma victims in the United States. This study provides evidence that AGVQ© is psychometrically sound in a South African sample. This analysis suggests that the psychological dimensions of attitudes towards guns and violence are common across cultures<P> Implications: Currently, major injury is a missed opportunity to initiate violence interventions. Findings from this study can assist in the development of tertiary violence prevention programs in trauma centers internationally.<P> <!--Abstract 13897 modified by 64.12.96.42 on 11-5-2002--></P></P></P></P></P></P></P>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDimensions of Violence in Patients Hospitalized for Gunshot Wound in Trauma Centers in Cape Town, South Africaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154770-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Dimensions of Violence in Patients Hospitalized for Gunshot Wound in Trauma Centers in Cape Town, South Africa</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sapnas, Kathryn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Miami</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ksapnas@miami.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Andy Nicol, Delawir Kahn</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To gain an in-depth understanding of the dimensions of violence: context, circumstances, and motivations that occur in patients admitted to the hospital with firearm injuries and test the psychometric properties of the Attitudes Towards Guns and Violence Questionnaire AGVQ&copy; (Shapiro et al., 1997).&lt;P&gt; Design: Prospective hospital-based study using survey research methods. &lt;P&gt; Sample: Cohort of patients (N= 138) admitted to Trauma Centers in Cape Town, South Africa admitted for gunshot wound(s). &lt;P&gt; Methods: Structured bedside interviews were conducted. Two instruments were interviewer administered. provided a respondent profile. The 23-item Attitudes Towards Guns and Violence Questionnaire AGVQ&copy; (Shapiro et al., 1997) (Cronbach a =.88) was used to assess the dimensions of violence. &lt;P&gt; Findings: The respondents were predominantly male (n=118; 86%), 18-29 years (n=88; 64%), single (n=90;65%), had not completed high school and were unemployed (n=75; 54%). Twenty-five subjects (18%) reported gang membership and 33 (24%) respondents had been shot before. Less than half (n=61; 45%) of the subjects knew who shot them. The AGVQ&copy; original four factor structure was replicated. Four scales with four items each were created. Scale reliability ranged from .71-.81. Factor 1 &quot;Comfort with Aggression&quot; items loaded from .69 to .82; Factor 2 &quot;Power/Safety&quot; items loaded from .71 to.75; Factor 3 &quot;Aggressive Response to Shame&quot; items loaded from .71 to.77; and Factor 4 &quot;Excitement&quot; items loaded from .63-.81.&lt;P&gt; Conclusions: The characteristics of respondents in this study mirror those of trauma victims in the United States. This study provides evidence that AGVQ&copy; is psychometrically sound in a South African sample. This analysis suggests that the psychological dimensions of attitudes towards guns and violence are common across cultures&lt;P&gt; Implications: Currently, major injury is a missed opportunity to initiate violence interventions. Findings from this study can assist in the development of tertiary violence prevention programs in trauma centers internationally.&lt;P&gt; &lt;!--Abstract 13897 modified by 64.12.96.42 on 11-5-2002--&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:15:51Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:15:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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