2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154772
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Accreditation Standards on Pain Management in U.S. Hospitals
Abstract:
Impact of Accreditation Standards on Pain Management in U.S. Hospitals
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Covington, Linda, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Middle Tennessee State University
Co-Authors:Suzanne Prevost
Even though effective pain management is a basic and essential component of good nursing care, pain tends to be minimally assessed, underreported, and undertreated in many health care environments. Recognizing pain as a major and largely avoidable public health problem, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations (JCAHO) implemented new pain management standards in January, 2001. <P> In this study, we used a web-based survey to document the impact of the new JCAHO pain management standards on pain management care in hospitals across the United States. A descriptive correlational study was conducted using a stratified random sample of members of the American Society of Pain Management Nurses (ASPMN). The invitation to participate was emailed to ASPMN members in 50 U.S. states. Sixty-nine nurses from 36 states responded. The number of interventions and scope of pain management programs increased significantly after implementation of the new JCAHO standards. For example, there was a 43% increase in the implementation of new or revised institution-specific pain management standards, a 17% increase in the number of institutions with pain management teams, and an 11% increase in the conduct of clinical research projects addressing pain. Changes were associated with the time of accreditation visits and the type of accreditation ratings received (e.g. Regular Accreditation vs. Accreditation with Commendation). The most common challenges identified in association with attempts to improve pain management were: institutional bureaucracy, physician knowledge deficits, physician resistance, and time/labor intensity. While the new standards have prompted increased attention to pain management, considerable opportunities remain for improving pain management knowledge, interdisciplinary collaboration, and other interventions to alleviate pain in U.S. institutions, as well as around the world. <!--Abstract 13926 modified by 68.52.103.78 on 11-6-2002--></P>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Accreditation Standards on Pain Management in U.S. Hospitalsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154772-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Accreditation Standards on Pain Management in U.S. Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Covington, Linda, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Middle Tennessee State University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lcovingt@mtsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Suzanne Prevost</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Even though effective pain management is a basic and essential component of good nursing care, pain tends to be minimally assessed, underreported, and undertreated in many health care environments. Recognizing pain as a major and largely avoidable public health problem, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations (JCAHO) implemented new pain management standards in January, 2001. &lt;P&gt; In this study, we used a web-based survey to document the impact of the new JCAHO pain management standards on pain management care in hospitals across the United States. A descriptive correlational study was conducted using a stratified random sample of members of the American Society of Pain Management Nurses (ASPMN). The invitation to participate was emailed to ASPMN members in 50 U.S. states. Sixty-nine nurses from 36 states responded. The number of interventions and scope of pain management programs increased significantly after implementation of the new JCAHO standards. For example, there was a 43% increase in the implementation of new or revised institution-specific pain management standards, a 17% increase in the number of institutions with pain management teams, and an 11% increase in the conduct of clinical research projects addressing pain. Changes were associated with the time of accreditation visits and the type of accreditation ratings received (e.g. Regular Accreditation vs. Accreditation with Commendation). The most common challenges identified in association with attempts to improve pain management were: institutional bureaucracy, physician knowledge deficits, physician resistance, and time/labor intensity. While the new standards have prompted increased attention to pain management, considerable opportunities remain for improving pain management knowledge, interdisciplinary collaboration, and other interventions to alleviate pain in U.S. institutions, as well as around the world. &lt;!--Abstract 13926 modified by 68.52.103.78 on 11-6-2002--&gt;&lt;/P&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:15:57Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:15:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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