The Role of Socialization in the Ability of Animal-Assisted Therapy to Decrease Loneliness in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154776
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Role of Socialization in the Ability of Animal-Assisted Therapy to Decrease Loneliness in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities
Abstract:
The Role of Socialization in the Ability of Animal-Assisted Therapy to Decrease Loneliness in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Banks, Marian R., DNS
P.I. Institution Name:Washington University School of Medicine
Co-Authors:William A. Banks, MD
Objective: To determine whether the ability of animal-assisted therapy (AAT) to reduce loneliness in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCF) works by increasing socialization (human-human interactions). Design: A randomized non-blinded design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Thirty seven cognitively intact residents from three long-term care facilities (LTCF) between the ages of 65-90 and lonely as measured by the UCLA Loneliness Scale, Version 3 (UCLA-LS) were recruited. Methods and Intervention: Six weeks of AAT on an individual basis (Individual) or in groups of 2-4 (Group) for 30-minute session/week with pre and post-testing with UCLA-LS during week 5. Outcome Variable: Pre, post, and delta (Pre minus Post) scores on the UCLA-LS. Findings: Four residents withdrew from the study, to give n=16 (individual) and n=17 (group). A two-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant effect on Pre vs Post scores: F(1,31)=25.3,p<.001 with no effect of Group vs Individual or of interaction. Newman Keuls showed that the Pre-test scores for individual and group did not differ. There was a significant difference between Pre and Post scores for Individual(p<0.05) but not for Group. There was no difference between the Post values for individual vs group. The delta scores correlated (p<0.01) with pre-test scores, demonstrating that the individuals who were lonelier received a greater benefit from AAT. Conclusions: The ability of AAT to reduce loneliness was not improved, and may have been worse, when administered in a Group setting. Therefore, the main effect of AAT in LTCF is not mediated by increasing socialization among the residents. Implications: AAT reduces loneliness in residents of LTCF but not by increasing socialization.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Role of Socialization in the Ability of Animal-Assisted Therapy to Decrease Loneliness in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154776-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Role of Socialization in the Ability of Animal-Assisted Therapy to Decrease Loneliness in Residents of Long-Term Care Facilities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Banks, Marian R., DNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Washington University School of Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bankswa@slu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">William A. Banks, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To determine whether the ability of animal-assisted therapy (AAT) to reduce loneliness in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCF) works by increasing socialization (human-human interactions). Design: A randomized non-blinded design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Thirty seven cognitively intact residents from three long-term care facilities (LTCF) between the ages of 65-90 and lonely as measured by the UCLA Loneliness Scale, Version 3 (UCLA-LS) were recruited. Methods and Intervention: Six weeks of AAT on an individual basis (Individual) or in groups of 2-4 (Group) for 30-minute session/week with pre and post-testing with UCLA-LS during week 5. Outcome Variable: Pre, post, and delta (Pre minus Post) scores on the UCLA-LS. Findings: Four residents withdrew from the study, to give n=16 (individual) and n=17 (group). A two-way ANOVA showed a statistically significant effect on Pre vs Post scores: F(1,31)=25.3,p&lt;.001 with no effect of Group vs Individual or of interaction. Newman Keuls showed that the Pre-test scores for individual and group did not differ. There was a significant difference between Pre and Post scores for Individual(p&lt;0.05) but not for Group. There was no difference between the Post values for individual vs group. The delta scores correlated (p&lt;0.01) with pre-test scores, demonstrating that the individuals who were lonelier received a greater benefit from AAT. Conclusions: The ability of AAT to reduce loneliness was not improved, and may have been worse, when administered in a Group setting. Therefore, the main effect of AAT in LTCF is not mediated by increasing socialization among the residents. Implications: AAT reduces loneliness in residents of LTCF but not by increasing socialization.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:16:10Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:16:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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