The Effectiveness of a Community Child Health Model of Care on First-Time Mothers' Need for Information and Support

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154777
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effectiveness of a Community Child Health Model of Care on First-Time Mothers' Need for Information and Support
Abstract:
The Effectiveness of a Community Child Health Model of Care on First-Time Mothers' Need for Information and Support
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Barnes, Margaret, PhD, RN, Midwife
P.I. Institution Name:Queensland University of Technology
Title:Dr
Co-Authors:Jan D. Pratt, Registered, Nurse, Midwife
Introduction: First time mothering is a challenging time as the woman and her family adjusts to their new role. Providing appropriate and effective community health services for this group has a long history in Australia, however, these services are often not evaluated. Objective: To evaluate a community model of care for first time mothers in terms of the following outcomes: provision of timely information, facilitation of social support networks and addressing individual needs through appropriate use of resources. Design: Quasi-experimental design using telephone interviews at 3, 6 and 12 months following entry into the service. Population, Sample and Setting: First time mothers with no risk factors and a well and thriving baby were invited to participate. The setting was community child health centres in metropolitan Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. A total of 152 women were recruited, 94 into the intervention group and 58 to the control group. Intervention: The new model of care incorporated timely presentation of information in a small group format, infant screening and surveillance in line with national recommendations, a drop in and self weigh service and individual consultation when required. Standard care involved a series (6) of group information sessions and individual consultation. Findings: No significant differences were found between control and intervention groups in relation to information needs or the development of social support networks. However, intervention group participants were less likely to access individual consultations than the control group (p=0.009). Conclusions: The new model is as effective as standard care, with women in the intervention group needing fewer individual consultations. This demonstrates an effective use of health resources without a reduction in the quality of service provided.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effectiveness of a Community Child Health Model of Care on First-Time Mothers' Need for Information and Supporten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154777-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effectiveness of a Community Child Health Model of Care on First-Time Mothers' Need for Information and Support</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barnes, Margaret, PhD, RN, Midwife</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Queensland University of Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dr</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">m.barnes@qut.edu.au</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jan D. Pratt, Registered, Nurse, Midwife</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: First time mothering is a challenging time as the woman and her family adjusts to their new role. Providing appropriate and effective community health services for this group has a long history in Australia, however, these services are often not evaluated. Objective: To evaluate a community model of care for first time mothers in terms of the following outcomes: provision of timely information, facilitation of social support networks and addressing individual needs through appropriate use of resources. Design: Quasi-experimental design using telephone interviews at 3, 6 and 12 months following entry into the service. Population, Sample and Setting: First time mothers with no risk factors and a well and thriving baby were invited to participate. The setting was community child health centres in metropolitan Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. A total of 152 women were recruited, 94 into the intervention group and 58 to the control group. Intervention: The new model of care incorporated timely presentation of information in a small group format, infant screening and surveillance in line with national recommendations, a drop in and self weigh service and individual consultation when required. Standard care involved a series (6) of group information sessions and individual consultation. Findings: No significant differences were found between control and intervention groups in relation to information needs or the development of social support networks. However, intervention group participants were less likely to access individual consultations than the control group (p=0.009). Conclusions: The new model is as effective as standard care, with women in the intervention group needing fewer individual consultations. This demonstrates an effective use of health resources without a reduction in the quality of service provided.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:16:13Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:16:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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