2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154779
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Ethnography of Cultural and Family Influences on Infant Feeding Practices
Abstract:
An Ethnography of Cultural and Family Influences on Infant Feeding Practices
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Barton, Sharon, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Judi Daniels, RN, MS
Objective: This paper discusses ethnography as a method to study cultural and family influences on infant feeding practices. Design: Longitudinal ethnography Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A purposive sample of 11 families was selected from clinics in rural Appalachian counties in the USA. The study is funded by grant number 1R15 NR08216-01 from NIH/NINR, 2002-2004. Concept or Variables Studied: Cultural influences on infant feeding were examined as well as personal and contextual factors influencing initial feeding decisions and the introduction of other foods and beverages. Community observations were conducted to add information about the selection, availability, and variety of infant foods. Methods: Strategies for the ethnography were developed from the work of LeCompte, Schensul, and Schensul (1999). Data were collected during in-depth interviews with mothers and others when the infant was 1-2 months old; 5-6 months; and 8-10 months. Community interviews were conducted with leaders who provided professional advice and implemented nutrition programs. Other data collection strategies included observations of the home setting and behaviors of household members. Community data collection included availability of infant formula and foods, advertisements in the community, store placement of foods, snacks, and beverages, placement of carbonated beverage machines, and evidence of community poverty and affluence. Findings: Families identified supports and conflicts related to feeding practices. Culture influenced initial choices as well as early feeding of solid foods and carbonated beverages. Common practices included the introduction of “family” foods rather than specific “infant foods”. Infant foods were readily available in the community as were non-WHO recommended foods such as snacks, juices, and carbonated beverages. Community leaders reported frustration with infant feeding practices. Conclusions: Ethnography is useful for understanding cultural and family influences on infant feeding. Implications: Ethnographic methods can provide multiple sources of information about health beliefs and practices.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Ethnography of Cultural and Family Influences on Infant Feeding Practicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154779-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Ethnography of Cultural and Family Influences on Infant Feeding Practices</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barton, Sharon, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sharon.barton@uky.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judi Daniels, RN, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This paper discusses ethnography as a method to study cultural and family influences on infant feeding practices. Design: Longitudinal ethnography Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A purposive sample of 11 families was selected from clinics in rural Appalachian counties in the USA. The study is funded by grant number 1R15 NR08216-01 from NIH/NINR, 2002-2004. Concept or Variables Studied: Cultural influences on infant feeding were examined as well as personal and contextual factors influencing initial feeding decisions and the introduction of other foods and beverages. Community observations were conducted to add information about the selection, availability, and variety of infant foods. Methods: Strategies for the ethnography were developed from the work of LeCompte, Schensul, and Schensul (1999). Data were collected during in-depth interviews with mothers and others when the infant was 1-2 months old; 5-6 months; and 8-10 months. Community interviews were conducted with leaders who provided professional advice and implemented nutrition programs. Other data collection strategies included observations of the home setting and behaviors of household members. Community data collection included availability of infant formula and foods, advertisements in the community, store placement of foods, snacks, and beverages, placement of carbonated beverage machines, and evidence of community poverty and affluence. Findings: Families identified supports and conflicts related to feeding practices. Culture influenced initial choices as well as early feeding of solid foods and carbonated beverages. Common practices included the introduction of &ldquo;family&rdquo; foods rather than specific &ldquo;infant foods&rdquo;. Infant foods were readily available in the community as were non-WHO recommended foods such as snacks, juices, and carbonated beverages. Community leaders reported frustration with infant feeding practices. Conclusions: Ethnography is useful for understanding cultural and family influences on infant feeding. Implications: Ethnographic methods can provide multiple sources of information about health beliefs and practices.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:16:18Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:16:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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