Health@Home: Family Structure, Technology and Home Health Information Management

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154782
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health@Home: Family Structure, Technology and Home Health Information Management
Abstract:
Health@Home: Family Structure, Technology and Home Health Information Management
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Brennan, Patricia Flatley, RN, PhD, FAAN, FACMI
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Title:Moehlman Bascom Professor
Co-Authors:Yichuan (Grace) Hsieh, MS
*Objective: Consumer health informatics innovation may be best accepted when the support and extend existing home health information management behaviors. We interviewed 49 self-identified individuals who were the primary health information manager in their homes. We explored household composition, the types and diversity of health information managed in the home, and strategies employed for the storage and retrieval of health information management. * Design and method: This study employed a non-experimental survey method applied during home visits and community interviews. * Setting, Sample: The population included home-dwelling adult volunteers recruited in a rural two-county area through a variety of means including advertisement, snowball sampling and referral. Twenty-one households consisted of at least one adult and one child; twenty-eight households included only adults (including seniors). * Concept: Home health information management is a behavior engaged in by one or more family members to store and make available for retrieval health information related to clinician contacts, advice for self-care and disease management, and logistics such as clinic appointments and insurances. * Findings: One-third of the respondents managed health information alone. Respondents managed 8-10 different types of health information (treatments, medication protocols, clinic contacts) from 6-7 different sources (clinicians, news media, family & friends). Twenty-nine households had in-home computers. Households with children managed factual health records such as immunizations, and were more likely than adult-only households to have computers. Respondents from households with computers were more likely to use public libraries and less likely to consult with family members and friends for health information. Information storage and retrieval strategies varied depending on the need for on-going reminders and the urgency with which information might be needed. * Conclusions: Home health information management strategies vary with family composition. * Implications: Consumer health informatics innovations must address family structures and home health information management behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth@Home: Family Structure, Technology and Home Health Information Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154782-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health@Home: Family Structure, Technology and Home Health Information Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brennan, Patricia Flatley, RN, PhD, FAAN, FACMI</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Moehlman Bascom Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pbrennan@engr.wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Yichuan (Grace) Hsieh, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">*Objective: Consumer health informatics innovation may be best accepted when the support and extend existing home health information management behaviors. We interviewed 49 self-identified individuals who were the primary health information manager in their homes. We explored household composition, the types and diversity of health information managed in the home, and strategies employed for the storage and retrieval of health information management. * Design and method: This study employed a non-experimental survey method applied during home visits and community interviews. * Setting, Sample: The population included home-dwelling adult volunteers recruited in a rural two-county area through a variety of means including advertisement, snowball sampling and referral. Twenty-one households consisted of at least one adult and one child; twenty-eight households included only adults (including seniors). * Concept: Home health information management is a behavior engaged in by one or more family members to store and make available for retrieval health information related to clinician contacts, advice for self-care and disease management, and logistics such as clinic appointments and insurances. * Findings: One-third of the respondents managed health information alone. Respondents managed 8-10 different types of health information (treatments, medication protocols, clinic contacts) from 6-7 different sources (clinicians, news media, family &amp; friends). Twenty-nine households had in-home computers. Households with children managed factual health records such as immunizations, and were more likely than adult-only households to have computers. Respondents from households with computers were more likely to use public libraries and less likely to consult with family members and friends for health information. Information storage and retrieval strategies varied depending on the need for on-going reminders and the urgency with which information might be needed. * Conclusions: Home health information management strategies vary with family composition. * Implications: Consumer health informatics innovations must address family structures and home health information management behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:16:27Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:16:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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