2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154785
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evaluation of Continuous Support in Labor
Abstract:
Evaluation of Continuous Support in Labor
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Campbell, Della Anne, CNA-BC, APN-C
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Title:Instructor
Co-Authors:Michele Lynn Falk, BA, MSW; Marian Frances Lake, RNC, MPH, CCRC
Objective: Research demonstrates that continuous labor support from a non-medical female trained in emotional and physical supportive techniques (doula) can improve perinatal outcome. The service cost of a professional doula may be prohibitive for low-income women. The objective of this study was to compare labor outcomes in women accompanied by an unpaid, trained female friend or family member (doula group)with women not accompanied by this additional support person in labor (no doula group). Design: Nulliparous women seen in a prenatal clinic in New Jersey were prospectively enrolled and randomized to the doula or no doula group between 1998 and 2002. Doula group members (parturient and doula) were taught traditional doula supportive techniques during 2 teaching sessions. No further interaction occurred in the no doula group after randomization. All enrollment and teaching was done by a research assistant who was a certified doula. Outcome data were abstracted from medical records. Variables: Primary outcome variables were length of labor and type of delivery. Secondary outcome variables included type and amount of analgesia and anesthesia, birthweight and Apgar scores. Findings: Six hundred (600) women were enrolled and randomized. Delivery information was available for 291 in the doula group and 295 in the no-doula group. Preliminary intent to treat analysis revealed a significantly shorter length of labor (p= 0.02) in the doula group. Despite a trend toward lower cesarean section and vacuum/forcep delivery rates in the doula group, differences did not reach statistical significance. No significant differences were found in dilatation at time of analgesia or anesthesia during labor, birthweight, or one and five minute apgar scores. More comprehensive data analysis is continuing. Conclusions: Empowering low-income pregnant women with the option to choose a female friend who will act as her doula during labor, along with other family members, shortens the labor process.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of Continuous Support in Laboren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154785-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evaluation of Continuous Support in Labor</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Campbell, Della Anne, CNA-BC, APN-C</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">della.campbell@verizon.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michele Lynn Falk, BA, MSW; Marian Frances Lake, RNC, MPH, CCRC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Research demonstrates that continuous labor support from a non-medical female trained in emotional and physical supportive techniques (doula) can improve perinatal outcome. The service cost of a professional doula may be prohibitive for low-income women. The objective of this study was to compare labor outcomes in women accompanied by an unpaid, trained female friend or family member (doula group)with women not accompanied by this additional support person in labor (no doula group). Design: Nulliparous women seen in a prenatal clinic in New Jersey were prospectively enrolled and randomized to the doula or no doula group between 1998 and 2002. Doula group members (parturient and doula) were taught traditional doula supportive techniques during 2 teaching sessions. No further interaction occurred in the no doula group after randomization. All enrollment and teaching was done by a research assistant who was a certified doula. Outcome data were abstracted from medical records. Variables: Primary outcome variables were length of labor and type of delivery. Secondary outcome variables included type and amount of analgesia and anesthesia, birthweight and Apgar scores. Findings: Six hundred (600) women were enrolled and randomized. Delivery information was available for 291 in the doula group and 295 in the no-doula group. Preliminary intent to treat analysis revealed a significantly shorter length of labor (p= 0.02) in the doula group. Despite a trend toward lower cesarean section and vacuum/forcep delivery rates in the doula group, differences did not reach statistical significance. No significant differences were found in dilatation at time of analgesia or anesthesia during labor, birthweight, or one and five minute apgar scores. More comprehensive data analysis is continuing. Conclusions: Empowering low-income pregnant women with the option to choose a female friend who will act as her doula during labor, along with other family members, shortens the labor process.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:16:35Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:16:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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