2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154798
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychological and Physiologic Outcomes in a Family Caregiver Intervention
Abstract:
Psychological and Physiologic Outcomes in a Family Caregiver Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Farran, Carol J., DNSc, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University Medical Center
Title:Professor and The Nurses Alumni Assocation Chair in Health and the Aging Process
Co-Authors:Judith J. McCann, DNSc, RN; Dimitra Loukissa, PhD; David Gilley, PhD; Julia L. Bienias, ScD
Objective: This study examined the effect of a cognitive behavioral intervention for family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s disease to decrease caregiver depressive symptoms and salivary cortisol, a physiologic measure of stress. Design: The study used a randomized trial, pre-test/multiple post-test design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Participants were community-based family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer’s disease. Ninety-nine caregivers were followed at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Two interventions were compared: a Caregiver Skill Building and an Information and Support Only intervention. Outcome variables were caregiver depressive symptoms and salivary cortisol (SC). Methods: Psychological data were collected during home-based and telephone interviews. Caregivers collected four saliva samples on two consecutive days (Early morning, Noon, 6 and 9 PM). Generalized linear models were used to examine changes in caregiver depressive symptoms over 18 months. Descriptive, correlational, regression and random effects procedures were used to examine SC. Findings: Caregiver depressive symptoms significantly improved over 18-months but did not differ by intervention. Baseline SC was significantly related to stress at time of saliva collection (r=. 20 to .34). To analyze SC, sequential models were run adjusting for key variables. There were no significant differences in the average SC slope estimate over the course of a day and over time. A second set of models found that average SC significantly increased over time (estimated rate of change over 18 months: 0.123: p=0.02). Conclusions: Both interventions were equally effective in decreasing depressive symptoms, it is feasible for community-based CGs to collect saliva samples, and additional methodological considerations need to be made when combining psychological and physiologic measures. Implications: Future randomized trials need to consider larger samples that use physiologic markers of stress and stronger interventions that address both care receiver and caregiver needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychological and Physiologic Outcomes in a Family Caregiver Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154798-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychological and Physiologic Outcomes in a Family Caregiver Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Farran, Carol J., DNSc, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor and The Nurses Alumni Assocation Chair in Health and the Aging Process</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Carol_J_Farran@Rush.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith J. McCann, DNSc, RN; Dimitra Loukissa, PhD; David Gilley, PhD; Julia L. Bienias, ScD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study examined the effect of a cognitive behavioral intervention for family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer&rsquo;s disease to decrease caregiver depressive symptoms and salivary cortisol, a physiologic measure of stress. Design: The study used a randomized trial, pre-test/multiple post-test design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Participants were community-based family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer&rsquo;s disease. Ninety-nine caregivers were followed at baseline, 6, 12 and 18 months. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Two interventions were compared: a Caregiver Skill Building and an Information and Support Only intervention. Outcome variables were caregiver depressive symptoms and salivary cortisol (SC). Methods: Psychological data were collected during home-based and telephone interviews. Caregivers collected four saliva samples on two consecutive days (Early morning, Noon, 6 and 9 PM). Generalized linear models were used to examine changes in caregiver depressive symptoms over 18 months. Descriptive, correlational, regression and random effects procedures were used to examine SC. Findings: Caregiver depressive symptoms significantly improved over 18-months but did not differ by intervention. Baseline SC was significantly related to stress at time of saliva collection (r=. 20 to .34). To analyze SC, sequential models were run adjusting for key variables. There were no significant differences in the average SC slope estimate over the course of a day and over time. A second set of models found that average SC significantly increased over time (estimated rate of change over 18 months: 0.123: p=0.02). Conclusions: Both interventions were equally effective in decreasing depressive symptoms, it is feasible for community-based CGs to collect saliva samples, and additional methodological considerations need to be made when combining psychological and physiologic measures. Implications: Future randomized trials need to consider larger samples that use physiologic markers of stress and stronger interventions that address both care receiver and caregiver needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:17:14Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:17:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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