Is Patient Right of Self-Determination Equitable? Ethnicity and Advance Directives

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154800
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is Patient Right of Self-Determination Equitable? Ethnicity and Advance Directives
Abstract:
Is Patient Right of Self-Determination Equitable? Ethnicity and Advance Directives
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Froman, Robin, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Univ of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Title:Dean of Nursing
Co-Authors:Steven V. Owen, PhD
Objective. The Patient Self-Determination Act (1992) identified rights to express advanced directives (ADs). This NINR funded research (1 R15 NR05216-01) describes the stability of ADs across 3-day hospitalizations. English and Spanish speakers and those having expressed or not expressed ADs were included. Design. This was a multiple-group comparison with an intervention. Variables. Attitudes about AD, Stability of ADs, Ethnicity (Hispanic or Non-Hispanic). Methods: Sample, Setting, Procedures. Subjects were hospitalized adults with minimum 3-day length of stay. Stratification created multiple comparison groups. First stratification by ethnicity created equal numbers of non-Hispanics and Hispanics. Half of each group had expressed ADs and half had no AD. Half of each group was randomly assigned to complete a self-report measure of attitudes about AD interventions (LSPQ, Froman & Owen, 2003) showing the complexity of ADs. Remaining participants completed a self-report of affect (PANAS, Watson, 1988). This created eight comparison groups. Participants were visited for three days to assess stability of ADs. Data were analyzed for ethnic group differences (non-Hispanic/Hispanic) in AD attitudes, stability of ADs, and change in AD related to questionnaire completed. Findings: Six of the eight comparison groups were fully enrolled (N = 106). The two groups of Hispanics with ADs, were not filled at the end of 24 months of data collection. The incidence of Hispanics with ADs, even in the hospital setting, is notably low. Hispanics completing LSPQ show attitudes more in favor of ADs for life support than do the non-Hispanics (p
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs Patient Right of Self-Determination Equitable? Ethnicity and Advance Directivesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154800-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Is Patient Right of Self-Determination Equitable? Ethnicity and Advance Directives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Froman, Robin, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Univ of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">froman@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Steven V. Owen, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective. The Patient Self-Determination Act (1992) identified rights to express advanced directives (ADs). This NINR funded research (1 R15 NR05216-01) describes the stability of ADs across 3-day hospitalizations. English and Spanish speakers and those having expressed or not expressed ADs were included. Design. This was a multiple-group comparison with an intervention. Variables. Attitudes about AD, Stability of ADs, Ethnicity (Hispanic or Non-Hispanic). Methods: Sample, Setting, Procedures. Subjects were hospitalized adults with minimum 3-day length of stay. Stratification created multiple comparison groups. First stratification by ethnicity created equal numbers of non-Hispanics and Hispanics. Half of each group had expressed ADs and half had no AD. Half of each group was randomly assigned to complete a self-report measure of attitudes about AD interventions (LSPQ, Froman &amp; Owen, 2003) showing the complexity of ADs. Remaining participants completed a self-report of affect (PANAS, Watson, 1988). This created eight comparison groups. Participants were visited for three days to assess stability of ADs. Data were analyzed for ethnic group differences (non-Hispanic/Hispanic) in AD attitudes, stability of ADs, and change in AD related to questionnaire completed. Findings: Six of the eight comparison groups were fully enrolled (N = 106). The two groups of Hispanics with ADs, were not filled at the end of 24 months of data collection. The incidence of Hispanics with ADs, even in the hospital setting, is notably low. Hispanics completing LSPQ show attitudes more in favor of ADs for life support than do the non-Hispanics (p</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:17:20Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:17:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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