Putting Humpty Dumpty together again: integrating mind, body, spirit and family in the long term care setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154807
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Putting Humpty Dumpty together again: integrating mind, body, spirit and family in the long term care setting
Abstract:
Putting Humpty Dumpty together again: integrating mind, body, spirit and family in the long term care setting
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Henley, Mozettia, RN, DNS
P.I. Institution Name:Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center/San Francisco Department of Public Health
Title:Program Supervisor, Nursing
Co-Authors:Lucy Fisher, RN, MS; Mary Louise Fleming, RN, MSN
People receiving care in long-term care settings are generally shadows of their former selves. Losses and changes in their overall clinical condition, level of functioning, relationships with family and the community; and their self-perception typically occur and influence their recovery and rehabilitation. Additionally, regulations governing nursing care in these settings direct providers to develop programs addressing each of these potential losses and challenges while providing individualized, continuing, comprehensive, high-quality care. These regulations support the need for an integrated and holistic care model. Despite a growing body of evidence supporting the interrelationship of mental health and physical illness, in relationship to the mind, we typically find that both severe and chronic psychopathologic care is left to the experts who are consulted to deal with a “problem”. Part of the reason the mental health piece does not receive, as much on-going attention is access. In these settings it can be difficult to link the person in need of these services related to availability and proximity of providers These realities present another set of challenges for nurses in delivering holistic care. Responding to these challenges evidence-based approaches are implemented developing the skill of front line nursing staff to effectively assess, plan and utilize psychosocial evidence in implementing care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePutting Humpty Dumpty together again: integrating mind, body, spirit and family in the long term care settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154807-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Putting Humpty Dumpty together again: integrating mind, body, spirit and family in the long term care setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Henley, Mozettia, RN, DNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Laguna Honda Hospital and Rehabilitation Center/San Francisco Department of Public Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Program Supervisor, Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mozettia.henley@sfdph.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lucy Fisher, RN, MS; Mary Louise Fleming, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">People receiving care in long-term care settings are generally shadows of their former selves. Losses and changes in their overall clinical condition, level of functioning, relationships with family and the community; and their self-perception typically occur and influence their recovery and rehabilitation. Additionally, regulations governing nursing care in these settings direct providers to develop programs addressing each of these potential losses and challenges while providing individualized, continuing, comprehensive, high-quality care. These regulations support the need for an integrated and holistic care model. Despite a growing body of evidence supporting the interrelationship of mental health and physical illness, in relationship to the mind, we typically find that both severe and chronic psychopathologic care is left to the experts who are consulted to deal with a &ldquo;problem&rdquo;. Part of the reason the mental health piece does not receive, as much on-going attention is access. In these settings it can be difficult to link the person in need of these services related to availability and proximity of providers These realities present another set of challenges for nurses in delivering holistic care. Responding to these challenges evidence-based approaches are implemented developing the skill of front line nursing staff to effectively assess, plan and utilize psychosocial evidence in implementing care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:17:40Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:17:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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