An Exploratory Study of Workplace Supports Among Canadian Health Care Employees

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154810
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Exploratory Study of Workplace Supports Among Canadian Health Care Employees
Abstract:
An Exploratory Study of Workplace Supports Among Canadian Health Care Employees
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Kane, Debbie, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Windsor
Title:Associate Professor
Purpose: In spite of increasing attention being directed to the problem of work-family conflict there is a dearth of research linking organizational support practices to actual outcomes related to work-family conflict. The purpose of this study was to identify how employee's perceptions of organizational and supervisor support, and utilization of organizational supports, influenced their perception of work-family conflict, general well-being, and propensity to leave. Method: A cross-sectional descriptive correlational survey was used that incorporated structured and open-ended questions. The convenience sample of 92 participants was drawn from a mid-size public health agency with 150 employees, that serves a community of 350,000 people. Findings: Flexible work hours, family emergency days off, unpaid leave of absence, personal days with pay, time off in lieu of overtime, short-term family leave, and employee assistance program were the supports most commonly used by the study participants. A significant relationship was identified between the use of flexible hours and general well-being. Utilization of family emergency days off was found to be significantly related to work-family conflict and absenteeism. Employees who perceived their organization as highly supportive also reported significantly lower propensity to leave scores. Implications: The significant relationship between family emergency days off and higher reports of work-family conflict and absenteeism suggest this support is being used by those employees the family-supportive policies are intended to help; those experiencing work-family conflict. Further, at a time when national headlines are reporting a critical shortage of healthcare employees it is particularly worthwhile to provide workplace policies that contribute to higher perceptions of organizaional support and reduced propensity to leave.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Exploratory Study of Workplace Supports Among Canadian Health Care Employeesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154810-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Exploratory Study of Workplace Supports Among Canadian Health Care Employees</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kane, Debbie, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Windsor</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dkane@uwindsor.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: In spite of increasing attention being directed to the problem of work-family conflict there is a dearth of research linking organizational support practices to actual outcomes related to work-family conflict. The purpose of this study was to identify how employee's perceptions of organizational and supervisor support, and utilization of organizational supports, influenced their perception of work-family conflict, general well-being, and propensity to leave. Method: A cross-sectional descriptive correlational survey was used that incorporated structured and open-ended questions. The convenience sample of 92 participants was drawn from a mid-size public health agency with 150 employees, that serves a community of 350,000 people. Findings: Flexible work hours, family emergency days off, unpaid leave of absence, personal days with pay, time off in lieu of overtime, short-term family leave, and employee assistance program were the supports most commonly used by the study participants. A significant relationship was identified between the use of flexible hours and general well-being. Utilization of family emergency days off was found to be significantly related to work-family conflict and absenteeism. Employees who perceived their organization as highly supportive also reported significantly lower propensity to leave scores. Implications: The significant relationship between family emergency days off and higher reports of work-family conflict and absenteeism suggest this support is being used by those employees the family-supportive policies are intended to help; those experiencing work-family conflict. Further, at a time when national headlines are reporting a critical shortage of healthcare employees it is particularly worthwhile to provide workplace policies that contribute to higher perceptions of organizaional support and reduced propensity to leave.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:17:48Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:17:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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