2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154811
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Community-Based Intervention for Families With Fussy Infants
Abstract:
A Community-Based Intervention for Families With Fussy Infants
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Keefe, Maureen R., RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah
Title:dean and professor
Objective: The effectiveness of a community-based intervention for families with fussy infants will be presented. Research networking and mentoring opportunities created through out the investigation will be highlighted. Design and Sample: The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated using a multi-site, randomized clinical trial. 164 healthy full-term infants with excessive unexplained irritability (between the ages of 2 to 6 weeks) were randomized to intervention or control group (n =121). A third group (n = 43) of infants were enrolled in a post-test only group. Variables and Method: The 4 week REST Routine, consisted of regulation, entrainment, structure and touch for the infants; and reassurance, empathy, support and time-out for the parents. The four outcome measures were: 1) amount of unexplained infant crying, 2) level of parenting stress 3) quality of maternal-infant interaction and 4) infant sleep patterns. The home-based intervention was delivered by trained advanced practice nurses during weekly visits. A separate trained evaluation team obtained measurements at specified intervals during and following the intervention program. Findings: Infants in the REST Routine group cried 1.7 hours per day as compared to 3 hours in the control group (p = .02). Statistically significant differences were found in the amount of parenting stress. No group differences in maternal-infant interaction or infant sleep were found, however some of the NCAST Feeding Scale items and sleep analysis revealed a modification in parent interaction patterns and infant sleep patterns. Conclusions and Implications: The findings support the emerging view of unexplained irritability as a behavioral pattern that is responsive to environmental modification and structured, cue-based care. Clinical recommendations for intervening with these families and options for program modification will be discussed. Distance-based networking and opportunities for mentoring of students, faculty, and clinical colleagues were unique aspects of this multi-site study that will also be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Community-Based Intervention for Families With Fussy Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154811-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Community-Based Intervention for Families With Fussy Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keefe, Maureen R., RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">dean and professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maureen.keefe@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The effectiveness of a community-based intervention for families with fussy infants will be presented. Research networking and mentoring opportunities created through out the investigation will be highlighted. Design and Sample: The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated using a multi-site, randomized clinical trial. 164 healthy full-term infants with excessive unexplained irritability (between the ages of 2 to 6 weeks) were randomized to intervention or control group (n =121). A third group (n = 43) of infants were enrolled in a post-test only group. Variables and Method: The 4 week REST Routine, consisted of regulation, entrainment, structure and touch for the infants; and reassurance, empathy, support and time-out for the parents. The four outcome measures were: 1) amount of unexplained infant crying, 2) level of parenting stress 3) quality of maternal-infant interaction and 4) infant sleep patterns. The home-based intervention was delivered by trained advanced practice nurses during weekly visits. A separate trained evaluation team obtained measurements at specified intervals during and following the intervention program. Findings: Infants in the REST Routine group cried 1.7 hours per day as compared to 3 hours in the control group (p = .02). Statistically significant differences were found in the amount of parenting stress. No group differences in maternal-infant interaction or infant sleep were found, however some of the NCAST Feeding Scale items and sleep analysis revealed a modification in parent interaction patterns and infant sleep patterns. Conclusions and Implications: The findings support the emerging view of unexplained irritability as a behavioral pattern that is responsive to environmental modification and structured, cue-based care. Clinical recommendations for intervening with these families and options for program modification will be discussed. Distance-based networking and opportunities for mentoring of students, faculty, and clinical colleagues were unique aspects of this multi-site study that will also be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:17:51Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:17:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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