Care Managers' Attitudes Toward Death and Caring for Dying Community-Dwelling Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154865
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Care Managers' Attitudes Toward Death and Caring for Dying Community-Dwelling Adults
Abstract:
Care Managers' Attitudes Toward Death and Caring for Dying Community-Dwelling Adults
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Mori, Ayami, RN, BS
P.I. Institution Name:Nagasaki University
Title:Nursing student
Co-Authors:Miho Matsui RN, PhD, Professor
Megumi Shimanuki RN, BS, Nursing Student
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Background: Public long-term care insurance covers not only geriatric diseases but also end-stage of cancer in Japan. Care managers are expected to coordinate care services for cancer patients, however, it is little known about their attitudes toward death and caring for dying community-dwelling adults. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine care managers? attitudes toward death and caring for dying community-dwelling adults. Method: A self-administered questionnaire that included demographics, experience with death or dying patients, seminar attendance about end-of-life care, and attitudes toward caring for dying patients measured by Japanese version of Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD), was provided to care managers belonging to home care support office in Nagasaki, Japan. The questionnaire was distributed to 218 adults. Of these, 140 returned (64.2%), and 136 (62.4%) fully completed the questionnaire. Results: The mean age was 43.0, and 102 (75.0%) were female. Of the 136 care managers, 69.4% experienced terminal care in their care management process, average number of  carding for dying adults were 2.9 (SD=5.3), and 95.4% felt difficulty in that care management. Nearly 60% attended seminar about end-of-life care. The average score of FATCOD was 111.9 (SD=10.3, range=90-140), positive attitude toward caring for the dying patient 58.9 (SD=6.8), and perception pf patient- and family-centered care 49.0 (SD=5.1), which means a slight higher score compared to previous survey in institutional setting. Conclusions: Most care manager in this study felt difficulty in their management of dying patients. Although 60% attended seminar regarding end-of-life care, education is needed for providing better management for dying community-dwelling adults. Conclusions: Most care manager in this study felt difficulty in their management of dying patients. Although 60% attended seminar regarding end-of-life care, education is needed for providing better management for dying community-dwelling adults.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCare Managers' Attitudes Toward Death and Caring for Dying Community-Dwelling Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154865-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Care Managers' Attitudes Toward Death and Caring for Dying Community-Dwelling Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mori, Ayami, RN, BS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Nagasaki University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aya_fu516@ybb.ne.jp</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Miho Matsui RN, PhD, Professor<br/>Megumi Shimanuki RN, BS, Nursing Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Background: Public long-term care insurance covers not only geriatric diseases but also end-stage of cancer in Japan. Care managers are expected to coordinate care services for cancer patients, however, it is little known about their attitudes toward death and caring for dying community-dwelling adults. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine care managers? attitudes toward death and caring for dying community-dwelling adults. Method: A self-administered questionnaire that included demographics, experience with death or dying patients, seminar attendance about end-of-life care, and attitudes toward caring for dying patients measured by Japanese version of Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD), was provided to care managers belonging to home care support office in Nagasaki, Japan. The questionnaire was distributed to 218 adults. Of these, 140 returned (64.2%), and 136 (62.4%) fully completed the questionnaire. Results: The mean age was 43.0, and 102 (75.0%) were female. Of the 136 care managers, 69.4% experienced terminal care in their care management process, average number of&nbsp; carding for dying adults were 2.9 (SD=5.3), and 95.4% felt difficulty in that care management. Nearly 60% attended seminar about end-of-life care. The average score of FATCOD was 111.9 (SD=10.3, range=90-140), positive attitude toward caring for the dying patient 58.9 (SD=6.8), and perception pf patient- and family-centered care 49.0 (SD=5.1), which means a slight higher score compared to previous survey in institutional setting. Conclusions: Most care manager in this study felt difficulty in their management of dying patients. Although 60% attended seminar regarding end-of-life care, education is needed for providing better management for dying community-dwelling adults. Conclusions: Most care manager in this study felt difficulty in their management of dying patients. Although 60% attended seminar regarding end-of-life care, education is needed for providing better management for dying community-dwelling adults.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:20:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:20:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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