Self-Reported Vision Status as a Correlate of Health Care Access Among Adult Women Respondents to the 2008 National Health Interview Survey

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154881
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-Reported Vision Status as a Correlate of Health Care Access Among Adult Women Respondents to the 2008 National Health Interview Survey
Abstract:
Self-Reported Vision Status as a Correlate of Health Care Access Among Adult Women Respondents to the 2008 National Health Interview Survey
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Sharts-Hopko, Nancy, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Villanova University
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose: Examination of self-reported vision status as it relates to ability to access various health care services among adult women participants in the 2008 National Health Interview Survey. 
Methods: This research, reflective of the Health Belief Model, was conducted using a descriptive design entailing sample analysis of an existing data base.  The sample comprised 21,781 adults (18-85+), including 12,267 women, in the National Health Interview Survey Adult Samples for 2008.  Data were collected by US Census workers during home interviews with telephone follow-up, using a complex probabilistic sampling design.  All states and the District of Columbia are represented, and underserved minority groups were purposively over-sampled.  The National Health Interview Survey is a computer assisted personal interview that takes approximately one hour and most items are structured fixed response questions; the interview schedule can be reviewed on the NHIS website.   Data were subjected to chi-square, correlation and regression analyses using SPSS 18.0.
Results: Women self-reporting no vision comprised 0.4% of the sample, while 13.0% reported low vision even with correction.  Significant relationships were found between self-reported vision status and:  ability to afford a prescription; having gotten a flu shot, obtained dental care, seen an eye doctor, OB/GYN, medical specialist, general doctor,   advanced practice nurse or physician?s assistant within the past year; having gotten a PAP test within the past two years; or ever having received a pneumonia shot or experienced homelessness.  No significant relationships were observed between self-reported vision status and:  having had a mammogram within the past two years; having a tetanus shot within 10 years; or reporting a usual place for routine and preventive care. Conclusion: 
Impaired vision is associated with a number of indicators of ability to access common health care services. 
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-Reported Vision Status as a Correlate of Health Care Access Among Adult Women Respondents to the 2008 National Health Interview Surveyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154881-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-Reported Vision Status as a Correlate of Health Care Access Among Adult Women Respondents to the 2008 National Health Interview Survey</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sharts-Hopko, Nancy, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Villanova University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nancy.sharts-hopko@villanova.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose: Examination of self-reported vision status as it relates to ability to access various health care services among adult women participants in the 2008 National Health Interview Survey.  <br/>Methods: This research, reflective of the Health Belief Model, was conducted using a descriptive design entailing sample analysis of an existing data base.  The sample comprised 21,781 adults (18-85+), including 12,267 women, in the National Health Interview Survey Adult Samples for 2008.  Data were collected by US Census workers during home interviews with telephone follow-up, using a complex probabilistic sampling design.  All states and the District of Columbia are represented, and underserved minority groups were purposively over-sampled.  The National Health Interview Survey is a computer assisted personal interview that takes approximately one hour and most items are structured fixed response questions; the interview schedule can be reviewed on the NHIS website.   Data were subjected to chi-square, correlation and regression analyses using SPSS 18.0. <br/>Results: Women self-reporting no vision comprised 0.4% of the sample, while 13.0% reported low vision even with correction.  Significant relationships were found between self-reported vision status and:  ability to afford a prescription; having gotten a flu shot, obtained dental care, seen an eye doctor, OB/GYN, medical specialist, general doctor,   advanced practice nurse or physician?s assistant within the past year; having gotten a PAP test within the past two years; or ever having received a pneumonia shot or experienced homelessness.  No significant relationships were observed between self-reported vision status and:  having had a mammogram within the past two years; having a tetanus shot within 10 years; or reporting a usual place for routine and preventive care. Conclusion:  <br/>Impaired vision is associated with a number of indicators of ability to access common health care services.  <br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:21:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:21:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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