How Do Thai Patients with End Stage Renal Disease Adapt to Being Dependent on Haemodialysis?: A Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154891
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How Do Thai Patients with End Stage Renal Disease Adapt to Being Dependent on Haemodialysis?: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
How Do Thai Patients with End Stage Renal Disease Adapt to Being Dependent on Haemodialysis?: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Yodchai, Kantaporn, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Faculty of Health, Medicine, Nursing & Behavioural Sciences
Title:PhD Candidate
Co-Authors:Trisha Dunning AM, RN, MEd, PhD, Professor
Sally Savage BA(Hons), PhD, Research Fellow
Areewan Oumtanee RN, PhD, Asst. Professor
Alison Hutchinson RN, BAppSci, MBioeth, PhD, Associate Professor
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose: 
To conduct a pilot study to explore how HD affects Thai patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) and understand the experiences of HD patients and their perspectives about adapting to being dependent on HD.
Methods:  
Data were collected using semi-structured interviews that focused on problems, feelings, thoughts, attitudes, and ways of adapting to HD.  Grounded theory method was selected to guide data collection and analysis.
Results: 
Five patients (age range 24 to 66 years; mean 44.60 years; mode = 24) participated in the study. Four main coping processes emerged during data analysis: planning, adjustment and avoidance, belief in religion and superstition, and living with hope.  In addition, the patients reported a range of adverse effects of HD including fluid restriction, fatigue, effects on sexual activity, altered body image, fear of dying, stress and depression, and suicide.
 Conclusion:
Thai patients with ESRD felt treatment, including HD, adversely affected their lives and required physical, psychological, and social changes to enable them to cope.  They reported use of a range of strategies to deal with the adverse effects.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow Do Thai Patients with End Stage Renal Disease Adapt to Being Dependent on Haemodialysis?: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154891-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How Do Thai Patients with End Stage Renal Disease Adapt to Being Dependent on Haemodialysis?: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yodchai, Kantaporn, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Faculty of Health, Medicine, Nursing &amp; Behavioural Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kantaporn.y@psu.ac.th</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Trisha Dunning AM, RN, MEd, PhD, Professor<br/>Sally Savage BA(Hons), PhD, Research Fellow<br/>Areewan Oumtanee RN, PhD, Asst. Professor<br/>Alison Hutchinson RN, BAppSci, MBioeth, PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp; <br/>To conduct a pilot study to explore how HD affects Thai patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) and understand the experiences of HD patients and their perspectives about adapting to being dependent on HD. <br/>Methods: &nbsp; <br/>Data were collected using semi-structured interviews that focused on problems, feelings, thoughts, attitudes, and ways of adapting to HD.&nbsp; Grounded theory method was selected to guide data collection and analysis. <br/>Results:&nbsp; <br/>Five patients (age range 24 to 66 years; mean 44.60 years; mode = 24) participated in the study. Four main coping processes emerged during data analysis: planning, adjustment and avoidance, belief in religion and superstition, and living with hope.&nbsp; In addition, the patients reported a range of adverse effects of HD including fluid restriction, fatigue, effects on sexual activity, altered body image, fear of dying, stress and depression, and suicide. <br/>&nbsp;Conclusion: <br/>Thai patients with ESRD felt treatment, including HD, adversely affected their lives and required physical, psychological, and social changes to enable them to cope.&nbsp; They reported use of a range of strategies to deal with the adverse effects.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:21:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:21:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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