Behavioral state and physiological responses of preterm infants to unimodal and multimodal interventions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154897
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Behavioral state and physiological responses of preterm infants to unimodal and multimodal interventions
Abstract:
Behavioral state and physiological responses of preterm infants to unimodal and multimodal interventions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:White-Traut, Rosemary, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Associate Professor and Department Head
Past researchers hypothesized that the high tech intensive care environment might be responsible when preterm infants exhibit iatrogenic developmental delays. Research focused on decreasing the environmental stimuli to reduce stress. Other researchers sought to replace the missing intrauterine environmental stimuli in the nursery. The current state of the art in developmental care includes stress reduction in the NICU (such as decreasing the noise and fluorescent lighting levels and optimal physiological positioning) and the addition of appropriate developmental intervention. Research has not yet determined the most appropriate forms of developmental intervention for preterm infants. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine how preterm infants 33 to 34 postconceptional weeks responded to two forms of unimodal sensory stimulation and to two forms of combined multimodal stimulation. A nonprobability sample of 54 preterm infants was randomly assigned to one of five experimental groups: control; auditory only; tactile only; auditory, tactile and visual; auditory, tactile, visual and vestibular. Intervention was applied for 15 minutes once daily for 4 consecutive days. Repeated measures ANOVA identified significant differences during intervention for HR (p=0.003), RR (p=0.0129), and behavioral state (BS) (p=0.038). Infants receiving any intervention with a tactile component showed increasing arousal during stimulation, indicated by increased HR, RR and BS. Daily increments in behavioral state response in relationship to learning curves will be presented. Analyses comparing infants responses in two different years (before and after the nursing staff instituted a developmentally supportive environment) will also be presented. Differences in daily weight gain were identified in two groups, suggesting the environment may impact the preterm infant's physiologic and behavioral responses as well as growth.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBehavioral state and physiological responses of preterm infants to unimodal and multimodal interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154897-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Behavioral state and physiological responses of preterm infants to unimodal and multimodal interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">White-Traut, Rosemary, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Department Head</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rwt@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Past researchers hypothesized that the high tech intensive care environment might be responsible when preterm infants exhibit iatrogenic developmental delays. Research focused on decreasing the environmental stimuli to reduce stress. Other researchers sought to replace the missing intrauterine environmental stimuli in the nursery. The current state of the art in developmental care includes stress reduction in the NICU (such as decreasing the noise and fluorescent lighting levels and optimal physiological positioning) and the addition of appropriate developmental intervention. Research has not yet determined the most appropriate forms of developmental intervention for preterm infants. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine how preterm infants 33 to 34 postconceptional weeks responded to two forms of unimodal sensory stimulation and to two forms of combined multimodal stimulation. A nonprobability sample of 54 preterm infants was randomly assigned to one of five experimental groups: control; auditory only; tactile only; auditory, tactile and visual; auditory, tactile, visual and vestibular. Intervention was applied for 15 minutes once daily for 4 consecutive days. Repeated measures ANOVA identified significant differences during intervention for HR (p=0.003), RR (p=0.0129), and behavioral state (BS) (p=0.038). Infants receiving any intervention with a tactile component showed increasing arousal during stimulation, indicated by increased HR, RR and BS. Daily increments in behavioral state response in relationship to learning curves will be presented. Analyses comparing infants responses in two different years (before and after the nursing staff instituted a developmentally supportive environment) will also be presented. Differences in daily weight gain were identified in two groups, suggesting the environment may impact the preterm infant's physiologic and behavioral responses as well as growth.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:22:04Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:22:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.