2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154908
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Research support for a three R model of burnout prevention
Abstract:
Research support for a three R model of burnout prevention
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Rich, Victoria, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Westmoreland Hospital
Title:Senior Vice President
The purpose of this study was to test a theoretically-derived stress-transformational coping model of burnout prevention. It was predicted that the proposed model would fit the obtained data. Burnout was hypothesized to be directly influenced by transformational coping and indirectly influenced by personal and organizational resources and perceived work stress. This model integrated Roy's Adaptation Model in Administration, Lazarus and Folkman's stress and coping model, and Maddi and Kobasa's personality hardiness model. A convenience sample of staff nurses (n=246) completed self-report instruments measuring their personal resources (control, self-esteem, and optimism), organizational resources (boss and peer support), perceived work stress, coping style, and burnout. Four styles of coping were studied: the two transformational coping styles of planning and action and cognitive reappraisal and the two non-transformational styles of avoidance and emotion-focused coping. The model was tested with LISREL VII analyses; separate analyses were conducted on each coping style. The findings indicated the proposed model did not adequately fit the data across the coping styles. However, acceptable goodness-of-fit was obtained in a revised model when organizational resources was given a direct path to burnout (RLR=1.83 to 1.94; GFI=.94; AGFI=.89). This revised model, the Three-R Model of Burnout Prevention (3RMBP), accounted for a significant proportion of variance in burnout (R=.65 to .76). Analysis of the path coefficients showed that personal and organizational resources had statistically significant negative relationships with perceived work stress. Organizational resources had a statistically significant negative relationship to burnout, but was positively associated with emotion-focused coping. Perceived work stress was positively related to degree of coping. Avoidance and emotion-focused coping augmented the effects of perceived work stress and increased burnout. The 3RMBP proposed that burnout is prevented through the use of three resources: (1) the social resources of the organization, (2) the personal resources of nurses, and (3) the use of appropriate coping resources when stress is encountered. This model demonstrates the importance of a caring organizational climate, boss support and most important, key factors that can be used by the nurse administrator in the selection, orientation, and retention of burning brightly staff nurses.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResearch support for a three R model of burnout preventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154908-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Research support for a three R model of burnout prevention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rich, Victoria, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Westmoreland Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Vice President</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to test a theoretically-derived stress-transformational coping model of burnout prevention. It was predicted that the proposed model would fit the obtained data. Burnout was hypothesized to be directly influenced by transformational coping and indirectly influenced by personal and organizational resources and perceived work stress. This model integrated Roy's Adaptation Model in Administration, Lazarus and Folkman's stress and coping model, and Maddi and Kobasa's personality hardiness model. A convenience sample of staff nurses (n=246) completed self-report instruments measuring their personal resources (control, self-esteem, and optimism), organizational resources (boss and peer support), perceived work stress, coping style, and burnout. Four styles of coping were studied: the two transformational coping styles of planning and action and cognitive reappraisal and the two non-transformational styles of avoidance and emotion-focused coping. The model was tested with LISREL VII analyses; separate analyses were conducted on each coping style. The findings indicated the proposed model did not adequately fit the data across the coping styles. However, acceptable goodness-of-fit was obtained in a revised model when organizational resources was given a direct path to burnout (RLR=1.83 to 1.94; GFI=.94; AGFI=.89). This revised model, the Three-R Model of Burnout Prevention (3RMBP), accounted for a significant proportion of variance in burnout (R=.65 to .76). Analysis of the path coefficients showed that personal and organizational resources had statistically significant negative relationships with perceived work stress. Organizational resources had a statistically significant negative relationship to burnout, but was positively associated with emotion-focused coping. Perceived work stress was positively related to degree of coping. Avoidance and emotion-focused coping augmented the effects of perceived work stress and increased burnout. The 3RMBP proposed that burnout is prevented through the use of three resources: (1) the social resources of the organization, (2) the personal resources of nurses, and (3) the use of appropriate coping resources when stress is encountered. This model demonstrates the importance of a caring organizational climate, boss support and most important, key factors that can be used by the nurse administrator in the selection, orientation, and retention of burning brightly staff nurses.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:22:37Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:22:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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