Levels of importance and satisfaction of nursing retention issues in 1991 for staff RNs in an acute care hospital in northwestern Ohio

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154909
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Levels of importance and satisfaction of nursing retention issues in 1991 for staff RNs in an acute care hospital in northwestern Ohio
Abstract:
Levels of importance and satisfaction of nursing retention issues in 1991 for staff RNs in an acute care hospital in northwestern Ohio
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Hummer, Anne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Detroit Mercy
Title:Associate Professor
During the 1980s and even today, many health care institutions view recruitment as the only method available to obtain needed RN staff. A few futuristic institutions recognize that it is much more difficult and expensive to rebuild a lost capability than to preserve what is already in existence and, therefore, support the philosophy A nurse retained is a nurse recruited.



Research Questions: What were: l. the most important retention factors; 2. retention dissatisfiers most frequently identified; and 3. nursing retention factors rated high in importance but low in satisfaction by staff RNs related to specialty area, educational preparation, years of experience, full or part time status and employed in an acute care facility in northwestern Ohio?



Hypotheses: There was no significant relationship between importance and satisfaction rankings of retention factors based on l. specialty area, 2. educational preparation, 3. years of work experience, and 4. full or part time status. All hypotheses were rejected.



A correlation (hypotheses) and descriptive (research questions) design were utilized in the study. The instrument, encompassing 25 retention factors, was developed by the researcher from an open-ended elicitation questionnaire, pilot study, and extensive literature review. The Cronbach Alpha coefficient for the research was 0.95. Significant retention factors were identified by using Spearman's correlation coefficients and a .01 significance level. This research found significant differences for the 163 RN respondents in levels of importance and satisfaction of nursing retention factors related to specialty area (critical care, maternal-child, medical-surgical), years of work experience, educational preparation and full or part time status. This research also identified relevant nursing retention issues existing in 1991 by determining mean importance and satisfaction scores with numerical ranking of the means from high to low.



The following retention factors were rated as highly important but low in satisfaction: l. Longevity incentives are available. 2. Hospital administrators are sensitive and understanding. 3. Shift and weekend compensation is adequate. 4. Nursing supervisors are supportive. 5. Salary is satisfactory. 6. Minimal job stress.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLevels of importance and satisfaction of nursing retention issues in 1991 for staff RNs in an acute care hospital in northwestern Ohioen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154909-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Levels of importance and satisfaction of nursing retention issues in 1991 for staff RNs in an acute care hospital in northwestern Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hummer, Anne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Detroit Mercy</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">During the 1980s and even today, many health care institutions view recruitment as the only method available to obtain needed RN staff. A few futuristic institutions recognize that it is much more difficult and expensive to rebuild a lost capability than to preserve what is already in existence and, therefore, support the philosophy A nurse retained is a nurse recruited.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Research Questions: What were: l. the most important retention factors; 2. retention dissatisfiers most frequently identified; and 3. nursing retention factors rated high in importance but low in satisfaction by staff RNs related to specialty area, educational preparation, years of experience, full or part time status and employed in an acute care facility in northwestern Ohio?<br/><br/><br/><br/>Hypotheses: There was no significant relationship between importance and satisfaction rankings of retention factors based on l. specialty area, 2. educational preparation, 3. years of work experience, and 4. full or part time status. All hypotheses were rejected.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A correlation (hypotheses) and descriptive (research questions) design were utilized in the study. The instrument, encompassing 25 retention factors, was developed by the researcher from an open-ended elicitation questionnaire, pilot study, and extensive literature review. The Cronbach Alpha coefficient for the research was 0.95. Significant retention factors were identified by using Spearman's correlation coefficients and a .01 significance level. This research found significant differences for the 163 RN respondents in levels of importance and satisfaction of nursing retention factors related to specialty area (critical care, maternal-child, medical-surgical), years of work experience, educational preparation and full or part time status. This research also identified relevant nursing retention issues existing in 1991 by determining mean importance and satisfaction scores with numerical ranking of the means from high to low.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The following retention factors were rated as highly important but low in satisfaction: l. Longevity incentives are available. 2. Hospital administrators are sensitive and understanding. 3. Shift and weekend compensation is adequate. 4. Nursing supervisors are supportive. 5. Salary is satisfactory. 6. Minimal job stress.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:22:39Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:22:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.