Telephone follow-up after acute myocardial infarction: From reserach question to nursing intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154923
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Telephone follow-up after acute myocardial infarction: From reserach question to nursing intervention
Abstract:
Telephone follow-up after acute myocardial infarction: From reserach question to nursing intervention
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Keeling, Arlene, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Virginia Health Sciences Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Problem Statement: Dramatic changes in the care of acute myocardial

infarction involving reperfusion therapies have decreased the

patient's length of hospital stay. This early discharge trend is

likely to continue, as supported by Topol et al. (1988). Early

hospital discharge post-AMI prevents nurses from effective

intervention in the areas of both psychological support and

education, leaving patients and families to cope alone with the

adaptation to this crisis.



Research Questions: The research questions posed in this study

were: (1) what is the lived experience of AMI patients and families

during the period of early convalescence at home? and (2) is there

a need for nursing intervention during this period?



Conceptual Base: This study is based on three conceptual

frameworks: (1) McCubbin's Double ABCX Model of family adaptation

to crisis, (2) Lazarus' theory of cognitive appraisal, and (3) the

nursing biopsychosocial perspective.



Design: A prospective, longitudinal design was used for this

descriptive study of AMI patients and families (N=22).



Sample Description: A sample of convenience of patients aged 30 to

68 and their spouses were interviewed by telephone for this

qualitative study. The study was conducted on the acute cardiology

unit of a mid-Atlantic tertiary care medical center.



Data Collection: Patients and their spouses were interviewed by

telephone at randomly selected times during the first two months

after discharge. Interviews, conducted by a cardiac nurse

specialist, were open-ended. Detailed notes were taken during each

telephone interview, and data was content analyzed using a theme

unit of analysis.



Findings: Themes that are emerging in preliminary data analysis

include (1) difficulty accepting changed health status, (2) patient

and family reports of cardiac risk factor reduction, (3) financial

difficulties, (4) uncertainty about care regimens and future health

status, (5) the need for referral, and (6) purposeful expression of

appreciation for the nurse's demonstration of caring.



Implications: Patients and families deal with many recovery-related

problems during the early phase of convalescence from AMI. These

problems are of increasing importance because of the national trend

toward early discharge. This study demonstrated that nursing

intervention during early convalescence is critical and telephone

follow-up is a cost-effective, helpful and necessary means of

achieving a holistic approach to patient and family care.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTelephone follow-up after acute myocardial infarction: From reserach question to nursing interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154923-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Telephone follow-up after acute myocardial infarction: From reserach question to nursing intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Keeling, Arlene, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Virginia Health Sciences Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem Statement: Dramatic changes in the care of acute myocardial<br/><br/>infarction involving reperfusion therapies have decreased the<br/><br/>patient's length of hospital stay. This early discharge trend is<br/><br/>likely to continue, as supported by Topol et al. (1988). Early<br/><br/>hospital discharge post-AMI prevents nurses from effective<br/><br/>intervention in the areas of both psychological support and<br/><br/>education, leaving patients and families to cope alone with the<br/><br/>adaptation to this crisis.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Research Questions: The research questions posed in this study<br/><br/>were: (1) what is the lived experience of AMI patients and families<br/><br/>during the period of early convalescence at home? and (2) is there<br/><br/>a need for nursing intervention during this period?<br/><br/><br/><br/>Conceptual Base: This study is based on three conceptual<br/><br/>frameworks: (1) McCubbin's Double ABCX Model of family adaptation<br/><br/>to crisis, (2) Lazarus' theory of cognitive appraisal, and (3) the<br/><br/>nursing biopsychosocial perspective.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Design: A prospective, longitudinal design was used for this<br/><br/>descriptive study of AMI patients and families (N=22).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Sample Description: A sample of convenience of patients aged 30 to<br/><br/>68 and their spouses were interviewed by telephone for this<br/><br/>qualitative study. The study was conducted on the acute cardiology<br/><br/>unit of a mid-Atlantic tertiary care medical center.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Data Collection: Patients and their spouses were interviewed by<br/><br/>telephone at randomly selected times during the first two months<br/><br/>after discharge. Interviews, conducted by a cardiac nurse<br/><br/>specialist, were open-ended. Detailed notes were taken during each<br/><br/>telephone interview, and data was content analyzed using a theme<br/><br/>unit of analysis.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings: Themes that are emerging in preliminary data analysis<br/><br/>include (1) difficulty accepting changed health status, (2) patient<br/><br/>and family reports of cardiac risk factor reduction, (3) financial<br/><br/>difficulties, (4) uncertainty about care regimens and future health<br/><br/>status, (5) the need for referral, and (6) purposeful expression of<br/><br/>appreciation for the nurse's demonstration of caring.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Implications: Patients and families deal with many recovery-related<br/><br/>problems during the early phase of convalescence from AMI. These<br/><br/>problems are of increasing importance because of the national trend<br/><br/>toward early discharge. This study demonstrated that nursing<br/><br/>intervention during early convalescence is critical and telephone<br/><br/>follow-up is a cost-effective, helpful and necessary means of<br/><br/>achieving a holistic approach to patient and family care.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:23:17Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:23:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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