Psychosocial Functioning of Hospitalized Chinese Adolescents and Their Families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154930
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychosocial Functioning of Hospitalized Chinese Adolescents and Their Families
Abstract:
Psychosocial Functioning of Hospitalized Chinese Adolescents and Their Families
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Kools, Susan, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of California San Francisco
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Christine Kennedy, Sarah Kong, Jyu-Lin Chen, Linda Franck, Thomas K. S. Wong
Objective: The purpose of the study was to describe behavioral and emotional problems, social competence, and family functioning of hospitalized Chinese adolescents. Design: The study was descriptive, cross-sectional. Sample & Setting: A convenience sample of 103 hospitalized adolescent patients and their families participated. Families came from five regions in the Chinese Mainland and two hospitals in Hong Kong.Variables Studied: Study variables included behavioral and emotional problems, social competence, and family functioning. Methods: Parents completed Chinese versions of the Child Behavior Checklist and the Family Assessment Devise. Hospitalized adolescents completed a Chinese Youth Self-Report. Findings: Hospitalized adolescents in Hong Kong and the Chinese Mainland exhibited lower behavioral and emotional problems than norms reported in community samples of Chinese and Chinese-American adolescents. In the domain of social competence, adolescents identified major academic concerns related to the disruption of hospitalization. Family affective overinvolvement was significantly related to adolescent psychosocial functioning, but only in Mainland Chinese families. Conclusions: The muting of affect and behavior seen in hospitalized Chinese adolescents may be attributed to cultural values and socialization practices that stress self-control, obedience, and forbearance in the face of suffering. Outward displays of emotion are considered inappropriate for youth. Likewise, education is highly valued in Chinese society and academic achievement is the primary task of adolescence. Illness and hospitalization compound academic-related stress for adolescents. The finding of family affective overinvolvement must be interpreted with caution as Chinese families have patterns of relating that are distinct from Western cultures. Implications: This study provided a first snapshot of the psychosocial functioning of hospitalized Chinese adolescents and their families. Their muted emotional and behavioral responses to hospitalization and the heightened stress of school disruption are possible indicators of this group's mental health vulnerability. Further research is needed to understand the impact of hospitalization on Chinese families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychosocial Functioning of Hospitalized Chinese Adolescents and Their Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154930-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychosocial Functioning of Hospitalized Chinese Adolescents and Their Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kools, Susan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">susan.kools@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Christine Kennedy, Sarah Kong, Jyu-Lin Chen, Linda Franck, Thomas K. S. Wong</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of the study was to describe behavioral and emotional problems, social competence, and family functioning of hospitalized Chinese adolescents. Design: The study was descriptive, cross-sectional. Sample &amp;amp; Setting: A convenience sample of 103 hospitalized adolescent patients and their families participated. Families came from five regions in the Chinese Mainland and two hospitals in Hong Kong.Variables Studied: Study variables included behavioral and emotional problems, social competence, and family functioning. Methods: Parents completed Chinese versions of the Child Behavior Checklist and the Family Assessment Devise. Hospitalized adolescents completed a Chinese Youth Self-Report. Findings: Hospitalized adolescents in Hong Kong and the Chinese Mainland exhibited lower behavioral and emotional problems than norms reported in community samples of Chinese and Chinese-American adolescents. In the domain of social competence, adolescents identified major academic concerns related to the disruption of hospitalization. Family affective overinvolvement was significantly related to adolescent psychosocial functioning, but only in Mainland Chinese families. Conclusions: The muting of affect and behavior seen in hospitalized Chinese adolescents may be attributed to cultural values and socialization practices that stress self-control, obedience, and forbearance in the face of suffering. Outward displays of emotion are considered inappropriate for youth. Likewise, education is highly valued in Chinese society and academic achievement is the primary task of adolescence. Illness and hospitalization compound academic-related stress for adolescents. The finding of family affective overinvolvement must be interpreted with caution as Chinese families have patterns of relating that are distinct from Western cultures. Implications: This study provided a first snapshot of the psychosocial functioning of hospitalized Chinese adolescents and their families. Their muted emotional and behavioral responses to hospitalization and the heightened stress of school disruption are possible indicators of this group's mental health vulnerability. Further research is needed to understand the impact of hospitalization on Chinese families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:23:38Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:23:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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