Effects of an Intervention for Hawaiian American Siblings and Caregivers of Children With Chronic Illness or Disability: A Pilot Study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154932
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of an Intervention for Hawaiian American Siblings and Caregivers of Children With Chronic Illness or Disability: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
Effects of an Intervention for Hawaiian American Siblings and Caregivers of Children With Chronic Illness or Disability: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Williams, Phoebe D., PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center, School of Nursing
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Arthur R. Williams, PhD, MPA, MA; Merle Kataoka-Yahiro, DrPH, RNC, APRN
Objective: Examine the effects of an intervention on Hawaiian American siblings and caregivers of children with chronic illness or disability. Design: Using a pretest-posttest design, sibling outcomes were: knowledge, attitude, mood, social support, self-esteem, and behavior problems; tools with good psychometric properties were used: Parental covariates also were measured: the Knowledge Test, FACES II, and POMS. The cognitive-psychosocial-respite intervention description was sent in a letter to parents along with the consent forms. Included five siblings [7-15 years old] and 5 caregivers of children with cancer [2], asthma [2], and developmental disabilities. Outcomes, Siblings: Mean Scores and Ranges [in parentheses], Before and After Intervention showed: Knowledge of Illness Test [18; 18], [24.33; 24-25]ùthe knowledge increase was statistically significant, t=19, p<.001. All other outcomes showed improvement. On the Benefits of the intervention, all reported ô10ö [on a single-item 10-point scale]. Outcomes, Caregivers: Mean Scores and Ranges were: on the Knowledge Test [43; 40-47], [45.8; 43-47]ùthe knowledge increase was significant,t=1.53; p<.10. On the Sibling Needs subscale, the knowledge increase from Before [13.4] to After [16.4] was statistically significant, t=19.8, p=.05. On the Benefits of the intervention [on a single-item, 10-point scale], one parent wrote a ô9ö, and the rest of the parents, æ10' each, for Self and for the Sibling. Conclusion: The intervention was beneficial to the families. Implication: A larger study would extend generalizability of findings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of an Intervention for Hawaiian American Siblings and Caregivers of Children With Chronic Illness or Disability: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154932-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of an Intervention for Hawaiian American Siblings and Caregivers of Children With Chronic Illness or Disability: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williams, Phoebe D., PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pwilliam@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Arthur R. Williams, PhD, MPA, MA; Merle Kataoka-Yahiro, DrPH, RNC, APRN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Examine the effects of an intervention on Hawaiian American siblings and caregivers of children with chronic illness or disability. Design: Using a pretest-posttest design, sibling outcomes were: knowledge, attitude, mood, social support, self-esteem, and behavior problems; tools with good psychometric properties were used: Parental covariates also were measured: the Knowledge Test, FACES II, and POMS. The cognitive-psychosocial-respite intervention description was sent in a letter to parents along with the consent forms. Included five siblings [7-15 years old] and 5 caregivers of children with cancer [2], asthma [2], and developmental disabilities. Outcomes, Siblings: Mean Scores and Ranges [in parentheses], Before and After Intervention showed: Knowledge of Illness Test [18; 18], [24.33; 24-25]&ugrave;the knowledge increase was statistically significant, t=19, p&lt;.001. All other outcomes showed improvement. On the Benefits of the intervention, all reported &ocirc;10&ouml; [on a single-item 10-point scale]. Outcomes, Caregivers: Mean Scores and Ranges were: on the Knowledge Test [43; 40-47], [45.8; 43-47]&ugrave;the knowledge increase was significant,t=1.53; p&lt;.10. On the Sibling Needs subscale, the knowledge increase from Before [13.4] to After [16.4] was statistically significant, t=19.8, p=.05. On the Benefits of the intervention [on a single-item, 10-point scale], one parent wrote a &ocirc;9&ouml;, and the rest of the parents, &aelig;10' each, for Self and for the Sibling. Conclusion: The intervention was beneficial to the families. Implication: A larger study would extend generalizability of findings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:23:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:23:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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