2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154936
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Unintended Pregnancy Prevention in Active Duty Women
Abstract:
Unintended Pregnancy Prevention in Active Duty Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Chung-Park, Min S., PhD, RN, WHNP
P.I. Institution Name:Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton
Title:Director of Occupational and Community Health
[Research Presentation] The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate the effects of a reproductive health educational program on knowledge, attitudes, decisional balance (pros and cons), self-efficacy, stages of change, and contraceptive use, and to identify independent variables most likely to predict behavior change in the use of contraceptives among single, active duty women during the 4-month study period. The theoretical framework for this quasi-experimental longitudinal study was based on the Contraceptive Behavior Change Model. Instruments consisted of pre-/post-test for reproductive health knowledge, and contraceptive behavior questionnaires for reproductive history, attitudes, stages of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy. Data were collected on three separate occasions at 2 months interval over a 4-month period. The intervention for the experimental group consisted of two class sessions, 2 months apart, while the control group received no intervention. Descriptives, t-tests, ANOVA, correlation, and regression were used to analyze data from the sample of 198 Navy enlisted females recruited from the USS ships in San Diego, CA. The program was effective in increasing knowledge, and in knowledge retention. A positive change in attitude, decisional balance, and self-efficacy over time were seen in the experimental group, making subjects more accepting about contraception. Study variables of attitude, cons, and stages of change correlated positively with contraceptive use (p<.05), while decisional balance and self-efficacy correlated with attitude, and stages of change with knowledge, attitude, and self-efficacy. Stages of change explained 93% (experimental group) and 73% (control group) of the variance in contraceptive use at the end of the program. There was a decrease in sexual activity and greater use of contraceptive methods over time among sexually active individuals in the experimental group, leading to decreased unintended pregnancies. Effective interventions to reduce unintended pregnancy are essential, and future research is needed to examine issues surrounding contraceptive non-use.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnintended Pregnancy Prevention in Active Duty Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154936-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Unintended Pregnancy Prevention in Active Duty Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chung-Park, Min S., PhD, RN, WHNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Occupational and Community Health</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mschungpark@cpen.med.navy.mil</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] The purpose of this study was to implement and evaluate the effects of a reproductive health educational program on knowledge, attitudes, decisional balance (pros and cons), self-efficacy, stages of change, and contraceptive use, and to identify independent variables most likely to predict behavior change in the use of contraceptives among single, active duty women during the 4-month study period. The theoretical framework for this quasi-experimental longitudinal study was based on the Contraceptive Behavior Change Model. Instruments consisted of pre-/post-test for reproductive health knowledge, and contraceptive behavior questionnaires for reproductive history, attitudes, stages of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy. Data were collected on three separate occasions at 2 months interval over a 4-month period. The intervention for the experimental group consisted of two class sessions, 2 months apart, while the control group received no intervention. Descriptives, t-tests, ANOVA, correlation, and regression were used to analyze data from the sample of 198 Navy enlisted females recruited from the USS ships in San Diego, CA. The program was effective in increasing knowledge, and in knowledge retention. A positive change in attitude, decisional balance, and self-efficacy over time were seen in the experimental group, making subjects more accepting about contraception. Study variables of attitude, cons, and stages of change correlated positively with contraceptive use (p&lt;.05), while decisional balance and self-efficacy correlated with attitude, and stages of change with knowledge, attitude, and self-efficacy. Stages of change explained 93% (experimental group) and 73% (control group) of the variance in contraceptive use at the end of the program. There was a decrease in sexual activity and greater use of contraceptive methods over time among sexually active individuals in the experimental group, leading to decreased unintended pregnancies. Effective interventions to reduce unintended pregnancy are essential, and future research is needed to examine issues surrounding contraceptive non-use.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:23:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:23:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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