2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154975
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methods for Diabetic Foot Disease Prevention Study
Abstract:
Methods for Diabetic Foot Disease Prevention Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Trible, Karen A., MS, MSN, RN, CPN
P.I. Institution Name:Fort Hays State University
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
Co-Authors:Dr. Mary Laurence Morgan, PhD, BSN, RN; Jo Ann Doan, MSN, BS, RN; Diana L. Pfannenstiel, BSN, MSN, FNP, C
[Research Presentation] Purpose: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) describes a causal chain leading to lower-extremity amputation in the Type 2 diabetic; such as minor trauma. Plummer and Stewart (1995) state: "preventing minor trauma and subsequent non healing ulcers might interrupt this causal chain" (p. 47). A global review of the literature validates that health education can positively impact the treatment/care compliance of diabetic patients who are at high risk for peripheral vascular impairment and potential extremity amputation. A diabetes mellitus Type 2 (DM2) study investigates if education/follow up at more frequent intervals of every six weeks will positively affect the foot screening status of Type 2 diabetics and disrupt the causal chain. Methods: Participants, diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), were recruited from the general population in central Kansas using notices in the media. Demographic data and health history/screening were recorded at baseline, using questionnaires. Participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group (N = 27) or a control group (N = 27). Members of the experimental group were contacted by phone every six weeks by a Registered Nurse (RN), who encouraged them to maintain good diabetic self-care and to attend scheduled appointments with their health care provider. Care- Results: The following assessments will be made at baseline, six months, and in one year, in all participants: health of feet (ability to detect touch, vibration, heat and cold, and presence or absence of prespecified visible lesions); risk factors for diabetic vascular injury (arterial blood pressure and ankle/brachial index); and control of DM (Hb A1c percentage). Conclusion: The study concludes in May, 2009; with ongoing/final statistical results available for the 20th Annual Research Congress. Plummer, E. S., Stewart, G. A. (1995). Foot care assessment in patients with diabetes: A   screening algorithm for patient education and referral. The Diabetes Educator, 21(1), 47-51.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMethods for Diabetic Foot Disease Prevention Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154975-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Methods for Diabetic Foot Disease Prevention Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Trible, Karen A., MS, MSN, RN, CPN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Fort Hays State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ktrible@fhsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dr. Mary Laurence Morgan, PhD, BSN, RN; Jo Ann Doan, MSN, BS, RN; Diana L. Pfannenstiel, BSN, MSN, FNP, C</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: The American Diabetes Association (ADA) describes a causal chain leading to lower-extremity amputation in the Type 2 diabetic; such as minor trauma. Plummer and Stewart (1995) state: &quot;preventing minor trauma and subsequent non healing ulcers might interrupt this causal chain&quot; (p. 47). A global review of the literature validates that health education can positively impact the treatment/care compliance of diabetic patients who are at high risk for peripheral vascular impairment and potential extremity amputation. A diabetes mellitus Type 2 (DM2) study investigates if education/follow up at more frequent intervals of every six weeks will positively affect the foot screening status of Type 2 diabetics and disrupt the causal chain. Methods: Participants, diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), were recruited from the general population in central Kansas using notices in the media. Demographic data and health history/screening were recorded at baseline, using questionnaires. Participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group (N = 27) or a control group (N = 27). Members of the experimental group were contacted by phone every six weeks by a Registered Nurse (RN), who encouraged them to maintain good diabetic self-care and to attend scheduled appointments with their health care provider. Care- Results: The following assessments will be made at baseline, six months, and in one year, in all participants: health of feet (ability to detect touch, vibration, heat and cold, and presence or absence of prespecified visible lesions); risk factors for diabetic vascular injury (arterial blood pressure and ankle/brachial index); and control of DM (Hb A1c percentage). Conclusion: The study concludes in May, 2009; with ongoing/final statistical results available for the 20th Annual Research Congress. Plummer, E. S., Stewart, G. A. (1995). Foot care assessment in patients with diabetes: A &nbsp; screening algorithm for patient education and referral. The Diabetes Educator, 21(1),&nbsp;47-51.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:25:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:25:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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