2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/154980
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining the Effect of Healing Touch on Radiotherapy Symptoms
Abstract:
Examining the Effect of Healing Touch on Radiotherapy Symptoms
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Wells, Nancy
P.I. Institution Name:Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Title:Director of Nursing Research
Co-Authors:Fern FitzHenry, RN, BSN, MM, PhD; Mary S. Dietrich, PhD
[Research Presentation] Purpose:   Fatigue is a common experience during radiation therapy (RT) and has a predictable trajectory. Healing touch as a means of restoring energy may hold promise in alleviating symptoms related to RT.  Aims of this pilot study were to determine (1) the feasibility of conducting a healing touch trial, (2) the acceptability of weekly healing touch sessions, and (3) the effect of healing touch on fatigue and quality of life in patients undergoing curative RT for breast cancer. Methods: A 2-group randomized clinical trial was used to test hypotheses related to the effect of healing touch versus sham healing touch (attention control) on fatigue and quality of life.  Participants were blinded to the intervention received.   Baseline data were collected on emotional state (anxiety and depression), fatigue and quality of life using validated instruments.  Patients received a 60-minute session of healing touch or sham each week of RT (5-7 weeks).  Fatigue was measured weekly, while quality of life was measured pre- and post-RT.  Patient interviews were conducted at the end of the trial to determine the acceptability of the intervention and gather recommendations for improvement. Results:   Results for 35/40 patients are reported.  Groups were comparable on demographic variables (mean age 51.6, SD=9.03, 86.7% Caucasian, 67.6 % employed full-time). The groups also were comparable for pre-RT anxiety and depression. Preliminary analysis suggest no significant differences between the two groups were found for fatigue.  Interviews suggest weekly sessions are feasible and the patients found the sham intervention realistic as a therapy. Conclusion: Conducting healing touch research in a clinical setting is feasible and acceptable for patients undergoing RT.  The lack of difference in fatigue between the groups suggests the close physical presence of nurses delivering sham therapy may have a beneficial effect equal to healing touch.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining the Effect of Healing Touch on Radiotherapy Symptomsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/154980-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Examining the Effect of Healing Touch on Radiotherapy Symptoms</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wells, Nancy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Vanderbilt University Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Nursing Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nancy.wells@vanderbilt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Fern FitzHenry, RN, BSN, MM, PhD; Mary S. Dietrich, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: &nbsp; Fatigue is a common experience during radiation therapy (RT) and has a predictable trajectory. Healing touch as a means of restoring energy may hold promise in alleviating symptoms related to RT.&nbsp; Aims of this pilot study were to determine (1) the feasibility of conducting a healing touch trial, (2) the acceptability of weekly healing touch sessions, and (3) the effect of healing touch on fatigue and quality of life in patients undergoing curative RT for breast cancer. Methods: A 2-group randomized clinical trial was used to test hypotheses related to the effect of healing touch versus sham healing touch (attention control) on fatigue and quality of life.&nbsp; Participants were blinded to the intervention received.&nbsp;&nbsp; Baseline data were collected on emotional state (anxiety and depression), fatigue and quality of life using validated instruments.&nbsp; Patients received a 60-minute session of healing touch or sham each week of RT (5-7 weeks).&nbsp; Fatigue was measured weekly, while quality of life was measured pre- and post-RT.&nbsp; Patient interviews were conducted at the end of the trial to determine the acceptability of the intervention and gather recommendations for improvement. Results: &nbsp; Results for 35/40 patients are reported.&nbsp; Groups were comparable on demographic variables (mean age 51.6, SD=9.03, 86.7% Caucasian, 67.6 % employed full-time). The groups also were comparable for pre-RT anxiety and depression. Preliminary analysis suggest no significant differences between the two groups were found for fatigue.&nbsp; Interviews suggest weekly sessions are feasible and the patients found the sham intervention realistic as a therapy. Conclusion: Conducting healing touch research in a clinical setting is feasible and acceptable for patients undergoing RT.&nbsp; The lack of difference in fatigue between the groups suggests the close physical presence of nurses delivering sham therapy may have a beneficial effect equal to healing touch.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:26:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:26:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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