Evidence for Shared Governance in Academia: Applying the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Framework of Leadership Improvement to an Academic Department of Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155042
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence for Shared Governance in Academia: Applying the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Framework of Leadership Improvement to an Academic Department of Nursing
Abstract:
Evidence for Shared Governance in Academia: Applying the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Framework of Leadership Improvement to an Academic Department of Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Long, JoAnn D., RN, PhD, NEA-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Lubbock Christian University
Title:Professor of Nursing & Director of Research and Development
Co-Authors:Cindy Ford, PhD, RN, CNE; LaNell Harrison, RN, MSN, PhD(c); Beverly Byers, EdD; Steve German, PhD; Rod Blackwood, PhD
21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: There is a global shortage of nurses (Buerhaus, 2008; International Council of Nurses, 2004).  Evidence suggests nursing leaders in academia experience high turnover (Mintz-Binder, 2009).  Leadership characteristics associated with shared governance (SG) play a role in establishing and sustaining healthy work environments (Aziz, 2005; Shirey, 2006); however, SG models have not been widely applied to nursing academia.  The need for transformation of the systems in which individuals work is pivotal to improved performance and organizational quality (Institute of Medicine [IOM], 2001). The Institute of Healthcare Improvement [IHI] supports a framework for building a leadership system capable of meeting the IOM challenge (IHI, 2006). This project evaluates the evidence for a SG model of leadership and discusses application of the IHI's Framework for leadership improvement in the restructuring and business plan development in a nursing education department.  Methods: A literature review conducted from 1985-2009 with PubMed, CINAHL, and Education databases using the study keywords yielded 47 articles. The articles were evaluated using the Stetler Strength of Evidence Scale.  The research questions were: 1) "What is the evidence for SG in nursing academia?" 2) "What are the fiscal, policy, and human resource outcomes associated with implementing a framework for leadership improvement, restructuring, and business plan development in a department of nursing?" Results: All existing literature was at levels V and VI using the Stetler Scale.  Evidence suggests utilizing SG in the workplace.  A comparative analysis of the financial, policy, and human resource outcomes when applying the IHI model of leadership improvement suggests the utility of this framework in facilitating leadership improvement in nursing academia. Conclusion: There is limited application of SG models in nursing academia.   Application of the IHI framework for leadership improvement may contribute to SG and healthy work environments in nursing academia and merits further study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence for Shared Governance in Academia: Applying the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Framework of Leadership Improvement to an Academic Department of Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155042-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Evidence for Shared Governance in Academia: Applying the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Framework of Leadership Improvement to an Academic Department of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Long, JoAnn D., RN, PhD, NEA-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lubbock Christian University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor of Nursing &amp; Director of Research and Development</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">joann.long@lcu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cindy Ford, PhD, RN, CNE; LaNell Harrison, RN, MSN, PhD(c); Beverly Byers, EdD; Steve German, PhD; Rod Blackwood, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: There is a global shortage of nurses (Buerhaus, 2008; International Council of Nurses, 2004).&nbsp; Evidence suggests nursing leaders in academia experience high turnover (Mintz-Binder, 2009). &nbsp;Leadership characteristics associated with shared governance (SG) play a role in establishing and sustaining healthy work environments (Aziz, 2005; Shirey, 2006); however, SG models have not been widely applied to nursing academia.&nbsp; The need for transformation of the systems in which individuals work is pivotal to improved performance and organizational quality (Institute of Medicine [IOM], 2001). The Institute of Healthcare Improvement [IHI] supports a framework for building a leadership system capable of meeting the IOM challenge (IHI, 2006). This project evaluates the evidence for a SG model of leadership and discusses application of the IHI's Framework for leadership improvement in the restructuring and business plan development in a nursing education department.&nbsp; Methods: A literature review conducted from 1985-2009 with PubMed, CINAHL, and Education databases using the study keywords yielded 47 articles. The articles were evaluated using the Stetler Strength of Evidence Scale.&nbsp; The research questions were: 1) &quot;What is the evidence for SG in nursing academia?&quot; 2) &quot;What are the fiscal, policy, and human resource outcomes associated with implementing a framework for leadership improvement, restructuring, and business plan development in a department of nursing?&quot; Results: All existing literature was at levels V and VI using the Stetler Scale.&nbsp; Evidence suggests utilizing SG in the workplace.&nbsp; A comparative analysis of the financial, policy, and human resource outcomes when applying the IHI model of leadership improvement suggests the utility of this framework in facilitating leadership improvement in nursing academia. Conclusion: There is limited application of SG models in nursing academia.&nbsp; &nbsp;Application of the IHI framework for leadership improvement may contribute to SG and healthy work environments in nursing academia and merits further study.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:29:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:29:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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