2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155059
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mindfulness Meditation: An Innovative, Additional Strategy for Weight Loss
Abstract:
Mindfulness Meditation: An Innovative, Additional Strategy for Weight Loss
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Spadaro, Kathleen, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:West Virginia University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Susan M. Sereika, PhD; John M. Jakicic, PhD; Susan M. Cohen, DSN, APRN, FAAN
21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation] Purpose: The specific aims were to explore the effects of a modified version of mindfulness-based stress reduction intervention added to the standard behavioral weight loss program (SBWP+MM) on self-regulating processes related to weight loss (primary), dietary intake, eating behaviors and physical activity (secondary) compared to a standard behavioral weight loss intervention (SBWP) and to explore the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. Methods: A randomized, controlled trial was conducted among 46 overweight/obese adults recruited from the Pittsburgh community.  Following initial screening and medical clearance, subjects attended weekly group sessions in either the SBWP intervention or the SBWP+MM intervention for 24 weeks.  Variables included:  body weight, dietary intake, eating behaviors and physical activity baseline, week 12 and week 24.  Adherence, feasibility and acceptability were measured through retention, attendance and self-monitoring rates.  Results: Thirty-five subjects (76%) completed the study.  Using an intention-to-treat model, mean total weight loss was 5.48 kg (SD=2.01) with a significant decrease in food intake (p<.00) and significant increase in physical activity and healthy eating behaviors (p<.00).  A insignificant mean greater weight loss was found in the SBWP+MM group (6.89kg v. 4.07kg).  Significant improvement in eating behaviors was found in the SBWP+MM group (p=.015).  The SBWP+MM group had a 30% higher retention rate, 21% higher attendance and 22% higher rate of diary return than the SBWP group.  Conclusion: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction added to SBWP could enhance the weight loss success with changes in eating behaviors, increased adherence and self-monitoring.  A larger, long-term study is needed for hypothesis testing.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMindfulness Meditation: An Innovative, Additional Strategy for Weight Lossen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155059-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mindfulness Meditation: An Innovative, Additional Strategy for Weight Loss</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Spadaro, Kathleen, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">West Virginia University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kspadaro@hsc.wvu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan M. Sereika, PhD; John M. Jakicic, PhD; Susan M. Cohen, DSN, APRN, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation] Purpose: The specific aims were to explore the effects of a modified version of mindfulness-based stress reduction intervention added to the standard behavioral weight loss program (SBWP+MM) on self-regulating processes related to weight loss (primary), dietary intake, eating behaviors and physical activity (secondary) compared to a standard behavioral weight loss intervention (SBWP) and to explore the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. Methods: A randomized, controlled trial was conducted among 46 overweight/obese adults recruited from the Pittsburgh community.&nbsp; Following initial screening and medical clearance, subjects attended weekly group sessions in either the SBWP intervention or the SBWP+MM intervention for 24 weeks.&nbsp; Variables included:&nbsp; body weight, dietary intake, eating behaviors and physical activity baseline, week 12 and week 24.&nbsp; Adherence, feasibility and acceptability were measured through retention, attendance and self-monitoring rates.&nbsp; Results: Thirty-five subjects (76%) completed the study.&nbsp; Using an intention-to-treat model, mean total weight loss was 5.48 kg (SD=2.01) with a significant decrease in food intake (p&lt;.00) and significant increase in physical activity and healthy eating behaviors (p&lt;.00).&nbsp; A insignificant mean greater weight loss was found in the SBWP+MM group (6.89kg v. 4.07kg).&nbsp; Significant improvement in eating behaviors was found in the SBWP+MM group (p=.015).&nbsp; The SBWP+MM group had a 30% higher retention rate, 21% higher attendance and 22% higher rate of diary return than the SBWP group.&nbsp; Conclusion: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction added to SBWP could enhance the weight loss success with changes in eating behaviors, increased adherence and self-monitoring.&nbsp; A larger, long-term study is needed for hypothesis testing.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:30:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:30:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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