Effects of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Body Sensation Interpretation, Anxiety Control and Panic/Agoraphobic Symptoms in Patients with Panic Disorder

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155084
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Body Sensation Interpretation, Anxiety Control and Panic/Agoraphobic Symptoms in Patients with Panic Disorder
Abstract:
Effects of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Body Sensation Interpretation, Anxiety Control and Panic/Agoraphobic Symptoms in Patients with Panic Disorder
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Choi, Yeon-Sook, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The Catholic University of Korea
Title:Assistant Research Scientist
Co-Authors:Soo Yang, PhD
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] The subjects were 82 patients diagnosed with panic disorder. Forty four were assigned to GCBT group for 12 weeks, one session per week and thirty eight were assigned to conventional therapy group including pharmacotherapy and supportive psychotherapy. During the 12 weeks' study period, catastrophic misinterpretation for bodily sensation, perceived anxiety control and panic/agoraphobic severity were measured at baseline, 6th week and 12th week. The data were analyzed by Chi square test, Fisher's exact test, t-test and Repeated Measures ANOVA. The findings were as follows: 1. The ranking scores in catastrophic misinterpretation on both panic body sensation and external events were significantly decreased after GCBT. In the control group, only the panic body sensation showed significant variance. In addition, the belief scores in catastrophic misinterpretation for panic body sensation and external event were significantly reduced at 6th week and 12th week in the GCBT group. However, those of the control group had no changes. 2. A significant increase in the perceived anxiety control was observed in the GCBT group. However, there was no difference in the control group. 3. Panic/agoraphobic severity was significantly decreased at both 6th week and 12th week in the GCBT. However, that of the control group decreased only at 6th week. In conclusion, this study indicates that GCBT has positive influences on body sensation interpretation, anxiety control and panic/agoraphobic symptoms in patients with panic disorder.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Body Sensation Interpretation, Anxiety Control and Panic/Agoraphobic Symptoms in Patients with Panic Disorderen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155084-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Body Sensation Interpretation, Anxiety Control and Panic/Agoraphobic Symptoms in Patients with Panic Disorder</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Choi, Yeon-Sook, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Catholic University of Korea</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Research Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ypssyrm@hanmail.net</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Soo Yang, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] The subjects were 82 patients diagnosed with panic disorder. Forty four were assigned to GCBT group for 12 weeks, one session per week and thirty eight were assigned to conventional therapy group including pharmacotherapy and supportive psychotherapy. During the 12 weeks' study period, catastrophic misinterpretation for bodily sensation, perceived anxiety control and panic/agoraphobic severity were measured at baseline, 6th week and 12th week. The data were analyzed by Chi square test, Fisher's exact test, t-test and Repeated Measures ANOVA. The findings were as follows: 1. The ranking scores in catastrophic misinterpretation on both panic body sensation and external events were significantly decreased after GCBT. In the control group, only the panic body sensation showed significant variance. In addition, the belief scores in catastrophic misinterpretation for panic body sensation and external event were significantly reduced at 6th week and 12th week in the GCBT group. However, those of the control group had no changes. 2. A significant increase in the perceived anxiety control was observed in the GCBT group. However, there was no difference in the control group. 3. Panic/agoraphobic severity was significantly decreased at both 6th week and 12th week in the GCBT. However, that of the control group decreased only at 6th week. In conclusion, this study indicates that GCBT has positive influences on body sensation interpretation, anxiety control and panic/agoraphobic symptoms in patients with panic disorder.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:31:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:31:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.