HIV Prevention: "Machismo", "Marianismo" and HIV Misconceptions in Low Income Chilean Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155086
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV Prevention: "Machismo", "Marianismo" and HIV Misconceptions in Low Income Chilean Women
Abstract:
HIV Prevention: "Machismo", "Marianismo" and HIV Misconceptions in Low Income Chilean Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Cianelli, Rosina, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Miami
Title:Associate Dean for Undergraduates Studies
Co-Authors:Nilda (Nena) Peragallo, RN, DrPH, FAAN; Lissette Irarrazaval, MS(c)
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Background: Socio-cultural factors and HIV-related misinformation contribute to the increasing number of Chilean women living with HIV. In spite of this, and to date, few culturally specific prevention activities have been developed for this population. The goal of the present study was to elicit the perspectives of low-income Chilean women regarding HIV and relevant socio-cultural factors, as a forerunner to the development of a culturally appropriate intervention. Methodology: As part of a mixed methods study, fifty low-income Chilean women participated in a survey and twenty were selected to participate in follow-up, in-depth interviews. conducted at a community clinic located in La Pintana County in the Southeast of Santiago. The area is considered one of the most socio-economically disadvantaged communities in the city, with 31% out of the 190,000 inhabitants living in poverty Results: Show evidence of widespread misinformation and misconceptions related to HIV/AIDS. Machismo and marianismo offer major barriers to programme development. Future HIV prevention should cultural aspects, stress partner communication, empowerment, and improving the education of women vulnerable to HIV. Machismo and marianismo present significant barriers to HIV prevention. In Latino culture, macho men represent male domination, and women are under their power. As a result, women lack the ability to make personal decisions and have dif Within this context, empowerment must be an important component of future HIV prevention efforts. Implications: Programs are needed to increase women's self-esteem, self-confidence and self-efficacy, as well as to decrease their dependence. In addition, training in communication strategies and negotiation skills with male partners are essential factors to include for an effective preventive program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV Prevention: "Machismo", "Marianismo" and HIV Misconceptions in Low Income Chilean Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155086-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">HIV Prevention: &quot;Machismo&quot;, &quot;Marianismo&quot; and HIV Misconceptions in Low Income Chilean Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cianelli, Rosina, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Miami</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Undergraduates Studies</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rcianelli@miami.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nilda (Nena) Peragallo, RN, DrPH, FAAN; Lissette Irarrazaval, MS(c)</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Background: Socio-cultural factors and HIV-related misinformation contribute to the increasing number of Chilean women living with HIV. In spite of this, and to date, few culturally specific prevention activities have been developed for this population. The goal of the present study was to elicit the perspectives of low-income Chilean women regarding HIV and relevant socio-cultural factors, as a forerunner to the development of a culturally appropriate intervention. Methodology: As part of a mixed methods study, fifty low-income Chilean women participated in a survey and twenty were selected to participate in follow-up, in-depth interviews. conducted at a community clinic located in La Pintana County in the Southeast of Santiago. The area is considered one of the most socio-economically disadvantaged communities in the city, with 31% out of the 190,000 inhabitants living in poverty Results: Show evidence of widespread misinformation and misconceptions related to HIV/AIDS. Machismo and marianismo offer major barriers to programme development. Future HIV prevention should cultural aspects, stress partner communication, empowerment, and improving the education of women vulnerable to HIV. Machismo and marianismo present significant barriers to HIV prevention. In Latino culture, macho men represent male domination, and women are under their power. As a result, women lack the ability to make personal decisions and have dif Within this context, empowerment must be an important component of future HIV prevention efforts. Implications: Programs are needed to increase women's self-esteem, self-confidence and self-efficacy, as well as to decrease their dependence. In addition, training in communication strategies and negotiation skills with male partners are essential factors to include for an effective preventive program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:31:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:31:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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