Proactive Reflection Utilizing Simulation in the Development of Nursing Student Clinical Judgment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155134
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Proactive Reflection Utilizing Simulation in the Development of Nursing Student Clinical Judgment
Abstract:
Proactive Reflection Utilizing Simulation in the Development of Nursing Student Clinical Judgment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:McKenzie, Carole A., PhD, CNM
P.I. Institution Name:Northwestern Oklahoma State University
Title:Associate Professor and Chairperson
Co-Authors:James L. Bowen, PhD
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Reflection provides a vehicle for nursing students to gain clarity and achieve better accountability and ownership in their roles while effectively transitioning when role change occurs (McKenzie, McVey and Thompson, 2006, 2007). This is manifested in ôepiphaniesö that students as well as faculty experience during the reflective process. Maslow (1971) described these as ôawakeningsö that occur as humans strive for self-actualization. Reflection provides a vehicle by which humans can examine these processes. Spurgeon and Bowen (2002) used a Reflective Judgment Model to explore the development of reflective judgment. This tool was used as the model for project development. It appeared logical to suggest that if students develop clinical judgment through reflection, the use of simulation technology would allow students to better prepare for the clinical area by providing them with typical clinical scenarios, utilizing simulation mannequins. Students would then utilize a phenomenon the authors called ôproactive reflectionö to anticipate how they would respond and document that reflection in writing. The students were then videotaped to determine if the anticipatory or ôproactiveö reflection enhanced students' insight into appropriate solutions to clinical situations. The study was conducted as a pilot, descriptive study with qualitative and quantitative components. Junior nursing students were utilized as study subjects in the nursing simulation laboratory. Students were given a reflective journal template to record their anticipatory and post scenario reflections and then videotaped by a trained, objective person. Videotapes and reflective journals were analyzed qualitatively for themes and similarities. Quantitative data was obtained from comparison of pre and post reflective journals, as well as demographic data. Analysis revealed that students are able to reflect proactively to anticipate clinical solutions thus providing opportunities to more effectively prepare students for the clinical arena. These insights are critical in assisting faculty in teaching clinical judgment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProactive Reflection Utilizing Simulation in the Development of Nursing Student Clinical Judgmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155134-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Proactive Reflection Utilizing Simulation in the Development of Nursing Student Clinical Judgment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McKenzie, Carole A., PhD, CNM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northwestern Oklahoma State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Chairperson</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">camckenzie@nwosu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">James L. Bowen, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Reflection provides a vehicle for nursing students to gain clarity and achieve better accountability and ownership in their roles while effectively transitioning when role change occurs (McKenzie, McVey and Thompson, 2006, 2007). This is manifested in &ocirc;epiphanies&ouml; that students as well as faculty experience during the reflective process. Maslow (1971) described these as &ocirc;awakenings&ouml; that occur as humans strive for self-actualization. Reflection provides a vehicle by which humans can examine these processes. Spurgeon and Bowen (2002) used a Reflective Judgment Model to explore the development of reflective judgment. This tool was used as the model for project development. It appeared logical to suggest that if students develop clinical judgment through reflection, the use of simulation technology would allow students to better prepare for the clinical area by providing them with typical clinical scenarios, utilizing simulation mannequins. Students would then utilize a phenomenon the authors called &ocirc;proactive reflection&ouml; to anticipate how they would respond and document that reflection in writing. The students were then videotaped to determine if the anticipatory or &ocirc;proactive&ouml; reflection enhanced students' insight into appropriate solutions to clinical situations. The study was conducted as a pilot, descriptive study with qualitative and quantitative components. Junior nursing students were utilized as study subjects in the nursing simulation laboratory. Students were given a reflective journal template to record their anticipatory and post scenario reflections and then videotaped by a trained, objective person. Videotapes and reflective journals were analyzed qualitatively for themes and similarities. Quantitative data was obtained from comparison of pre and post reflective journals, as well as demographic data. Analysis revealed that students are able to reflect proactively to anticipate clinical solutions thus providing opportunities to more effectively prepare students for the clinical arena. These insights are critical in assisting faculty in teaching clinical judgment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:34:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:34:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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