A Descriptive Study on Nursing Diagnoses and Interventions for End-Stage Cancer Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155140
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Descriptive Study on Nursing Diagnoses and Interventions for End-Stage Cancer Patients
Abstract:
A Descriptive Study on Nursing Diagnoses and Interventions for End-Stage Cancer Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Ogasawara, Chie, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Hiroshima International University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Saori Yoshioka, RN, MSN; Tomoko Hasegawa, PhD, RN, MPH; Yasuko Kume, RN, PhD; Edmont C. Katz, MA, TESOL/Linguistics; Yuki Kumagai, RN, MSN
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Introduction: It is essential for oncology nurses to understand patients' total pain and to support patients' QOL at the end of their lives. Since the patients with end-stage cancer are suffering tremendous distresses, nurses have to accurately judge nursing diagnoses, and provide appropriate dying cares. It is very important to clarify characteristics of nursing diagnoses and dying cares for these patients. Purpose: To identify physiological symptoms, nursing diagnoses and specific nursing interventions to dying cares for patients with end-stage cancers. Methods: Data were collected through a survey from convenience samples of three hundred sixty five registered nurses who regularly provided direct patient cares for patients with end-stage cancers in Japan. The questionnaire consisted of nurses' demographic data and 3 lists: a) physiological symptom list selected from Carpenito's Handbook (Carpenito-Moyet, 2006), b) NANDA-I nursing diagnosis (ND) list, and c) dying cares list selected from NIC book (McCloskey & Bulechek, 2004). Nurses were asked to specify frequency of stating each of the patient symptoms, NDs, and dying cares on the lists. Frequency of each item was stated a five Likert Scale. Results: Frequently stated patients' physiological symptoms were respiratory failure, hemorrhage, malnutrition, anemia, and ileus. The frequently stated nursing diagnoses were Chronic pain, Activity intolerance, Acute pain, Anxiety, Impaired skin integrity, and Fatigue. The nursing diagnoses that induced dying cares were Death anxiety, Decisional conflict, Anxiety, Risk for aspiration, and Caregiver role strain. The dying cares for these nursing diagnoses were ôCommunicate willingness to discuss deathö, ôFacilitate obtaining spiritual support for patient and familyö, ôInclude the family in care decisions and activities, as desiredö, and ôMonitor mood changeö. Conclusion: These results indicated that nursing diagnoses stated for patients with end-stage cancer were appropriate to support patients' QOL at the end of their lives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Descriptive Study on Nursing Diagnoses and Interventions for End-Stage Cancer Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155140-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Descriptive Study on Nursing Diagnoses and Interventions for End-Stage Cancer Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ogasawara, Chie, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hiroshima International University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">o-chie@ns.hirokoku-u.ac.jp</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Saori Yoshioka, RN, MSN; Tomoko Hasegawa, PhD, RN, MPH; Yasuko Kume, RN, PhD; Edmont C. Katz, MA, TESOL/Linguistics; Yuki Kumagai, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Introduction: It is essential for oncology nurses to understand patients' total pain and to support patients' QOL at the end of their lives. Since the patients with end-stage cancer are suffering tremendous distresses, nurses have to accurately judge nursing diagnoses, and provide appropriate dying cares. It is very important to clarify characteristics of nursing diagnoses and dying cares for these patients. Purpose: To identify physiological symptoms, nursing diagnoses and specific nursing interventions to dying cares for patients with end-stage cancers. Methods: Data were collected through a survey from convenience samples of three hundred sixty five registered nurses who regularly provided direct patient cares for patients with end-stage cancers in Japan. The questionnaire consisted of nurses' demographic data and 3 lists: a) physiological symptom list selected from Carpenito's Handbook (Carpenito-Moyet, 2006), b) NANDA-I nursing diagnosis (ND) list, and c) dying cares list selected from NIC book (McCloskey &amp; Bulechek, 2004). Nurses were asked to specify frequency of stating each of the patient symptoms, NDs, and dying cares on the lists. Frequency of each item was stated a five Likert Scale. Results: Frequently stated patients' physiological symptoms were respiratory failure, hemorrhage, malnutrition, anemia, and ileus. The frequently stated nursing diagnoses were Chronic pain, Activity intolerance, Acute pain, Anxiety, Impaired skin integrity, and Fatigue. The nursing diagnoses that induced dying cares were Death anxiety, Decisional conflict, Anxiety, Risk for aspiration, and Caregiver role strain. The dying cares for these nursing diagnoses were &ocirc;Communicate willingness to discuss death&ouml;, &ocirc;Facilitate obtaining spiritual support for patient and family&ouml;, &ocirc;Include the family in care decisions and activities, as desired&ouml;, and &ocirc;Monitor mood change&ouml;. Conclusion: These results indicated that nursing diagnoses stated for patients with end-stage cancer were appropriate to support patients' QOL at the end of their lives.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:34:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:34:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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