Effect of Knowledge and Health Beliefs on Exercise Behavior and Calcium Intake in Men 50 Years of Age and Older

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155145
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Knowledge and Health Beliefs on Exercise Behavior and Calcium Intake in Men 50 Years of Age and Older
Abstract:
Effect of Knowledge and Health Beliefs on Exercise Behavior and Calcium Intake in Men 50 Years of Age and Older
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Sedlak, Carol A., PhD, RN, CNS, ONC, CNE
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Margaret A. Doheny, PhD, RN, CNS, ONC, CNE; Patricia Estok, PhD, RN, FAAN; Richard Zeller, PhD
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Prevention of osteoporosis is an important health care concern. This longitudinal study was based on the Revised Health Belief model (RHBM) and was designed to evaluate the relationship of knowledge, health beliefs, exercise and calcium intake in men 50 years of age and older at 6 and 12 months. The independent variables are knowledge of osteoporosis and RHBM variables (susceptibility, seriousness, benefits, barriers, motivation, self-efficacy); the dependent osteoporosis preventing behavior (OPB) variables are calcium intake and exercise. The specific aim of this analysis was to determine if knowledge of osteoporosis or RHBM had the stronger causal effect on OPBs. The theoretical model specified that ôknowledgeö is made up of the awareness of the respondent to the beneficial effects of a variety of foods and activities, and ôbeliefsö are made up of the respondent's attitudes on a variety of issues. An empirical unidimensional knowledge score was created by summing the relevant knowledge items and a unidimensional beliefs score by solving for the best linear combination of the wide variety of beliefs that predicted exercise and calcium intake outcomes. A ôknowledge scoreö and a ôbeliefs scoreö were used to predict each outcome (exercise and calcium intake). Multiple regression analyses demonstrated the overwhelming power of health beliefs in predicting the two OPBs at baselines and 6 months; however, 12 months knowledge became more strongly correlated with calcium intake than beliefs. Awareness of men's health beliefs may assist health care providers in developing more effective interventions to increase osteoporosis preventing behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Knowledge and Health Beliefs on Exercise Behavior and Calcium Intake in Men 50 Years of Age and Olderen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155145-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Knowledge and Health Beliefs on Exercise Behavior and Calcium Intake in Men 50 Years of Age and Older</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sedlak, Carol A., PhD, RN, CNS, ONC, CNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">csedlak@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret A. Doheny, PhD, RN, CNS, ONC, CNE; Patricia Estok, PhD, RN, FAAN; Richard Zeller, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Prevention of osteoporosis is an important health care concern. This longitudinal study was based on the Revised Health Belief model (RHBM) and was designed to evaluate the relationship of knowledge, health beliefs, exercise and calcium intake in men 50 years of age and older at 6 and 12 months. The independent variables are knowledge of osteoporosis and RHBM variables (susceptibility, seriousness, benefits, barriers, motivation, self-efficacy); the dependent osteoporosis preventing behavior (OPB) variables are calcium intake and exercise. The specific aim of this analysis was to determine if knowledge of osteoporosis or RHBM had the stronger causal effect on OPBs. The theoretical model specified that &ocirc;knowledge&ouml; is made up of the awareness of the respondent to the beneficial effects of a variety of foods and activities, and &ocirc;beliefs&ouml; are made up of the respondent's attitudes on a variety of issues. An empirical unidimensional knowledge score was created by summing the relevant knowledge items and a unidimensional beliefs score by solving for the best linear combination of the wide variety of beliefs that predicted exercise and calcium intake outcomes. A &ocirc;knowledge score&ouml; and a &ocirc;beliefs score&ouml; were used to predict each outcome (exercise and calcium intake). Multiple regression analyses demonstrated the overwhelming power of health beliefs in predicting the two OPBs at baselines and 6 months; however, 12 months knowledge became more strongly correlated with calcium intake than beliefs. Awareness of men's health beliefs may assist health care providers in developing more effective interventions to increase osteoporosis preventing behaviors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:34:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:34:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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