2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155172
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hurricane Disaster Response: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina
Abstract:
Hurricane Disaster Response: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bowers-Klaine, Elizabeth L., BSN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Keesler Medical Center, US Air Force
Title:Chief Nurse
[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Purpose:  Nursing leadership plays a key role in formulating healthcare facility disaster plans.  When an adverse event such as a hurricane is predicted, pre-disaster preparation is essential in mitigating damage and loss of life.  Critical thinking, triage of issues, and clear delegation of roles and responsibilities will enable the nursing leadership to  mitigate untoward effects of the disaster on patients and staff.  Post-disaster, a mulit-disciplinary recovery plan will allow the organization to get back to it's healthcare mission. Methods:  Case Study Results:  At Keesler Medical Center, a 78-bed military medical center in Biloxi, Mississippi, hurricane disaster plans were activated in the week preceding Hurricane Katrina in Aug 2005.  The facility served both as a healthcare facility and a storm shelter for high risk patients, staff members and their families.  As Hurricane Katrina came on shore, a 25 foot storm surge and high winds caused catastrophic flooding within the medical center, crippling communication and electrical generators.  Twenty-five inpatients, including 2 on ventilators were sustained for more than 36 hours in sweltering temperatures until safe evacuation could be conducted.  Using Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as a framework, disaster recovery began by focusing on physiological and safety needs for the 1300 survivors in the medical center.  Following the storm, nursing leadership was essential in the provision of healthcare from temporary facilities during a year-long facility reconstruction. Outreach efforts to the local community were coordinated with FEMA and Red Cross disaster assistance teams to assess healthcare needs in nearby shelters.  Conclusions:  Nursing leadership is essential in every step of disaster preparation and recovery.  Lessons learned from this real-world disaster and recovery can be used to develop or refine disaster response plans across the globe.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHurricane Disaster Response: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrinaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155172-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hurricane Disaster Response: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bowers-Klaine, Elizabeth L., BSN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Keesler Medical Center, US Air Force</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Chief Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">elizabeth.bowers-klaine@keesler.af.mil</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp; Nursing leadership plays a key role in formulating healthcare facility disaster plans.&nbsp; When an adverse event such as a hurricane is predicted, pre-disaster preparation is essential in mitigating damage and loss of life.&nbsp; Critical thinking, triage of issues, and clear delegation of roles and responsibilities will enable the nursing leadership to &nbsp;mitigate untoward effects of the disaster on patients and staff.&nbsp; Post-disaster, a mulit-disciplinary recovery plan will&nbsp;allow the organization to get back to it's healthcare mission. Methods:&nbsp; Case Study Results:&nbsp; At Keesler Medical Center, a 78-bed military medical center in Biloxi, Mississippi, hurricane disaster plans were activated in the week preceding&nbsp;Hurricane Katrina in Aug 2005.&nbsp; The facility served both as a healthcare facility and a storm shelter for high risk patients, staff members and their families.&nbsp; As Hurricane Katrina came on shore, a 25 foot storm surge and high winds caused catastrophic flooding within the medical center, crippling communication and electrical generators.&nbsp; Twenty-five inpatients, including 2 on ventilators were sustained for more than 36 hours in sweltering temperatures until safe evacuation could be conducted.&nbsp; Using Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs as a framework, disaster recovery began by focusing on physiological and safety needs for the 1300 survivors in the medical center.&nbsp; Following the storm, nursing leadership was essential in the provision of healthcare from temporary facilities during a year-long facility reconstruction. Outreach efforts to the local community were coordinated with FEMA and Red Cross disaster assistance teams to assess healthcare needs in nearby shelters.&nbsp; Conclusions:&nbsp; Nursing leadership is essential in every step of disaster preparation and recovery.&nbsp; Lessons learned from this real-world disaster and recovery can be used to develop or refine disaster response plans across the globe.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:36:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:36:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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