Implementation of a Multi-Faceted Nursing Strategy to Prevent Pressure Ulcers and Improve Patient Safety

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155173
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation of a Multi-Faceted Nursing Strategy to Prevent Pressure Ulcers and Improve Patient Safety
Abstract:
Implementation of a Multi-Faceted Nursing Strategy to Prevent Pressure Ulcers and Improve Patient Safety
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Bucknall, Tracey, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Cabrini Health
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Helen Forbes, RN, PhD; Caroline Nicolas, BA(Hons); Yvette Gomez, RN, GCPallCare, GDCounsPsychotherapy, GDTD, MPET; Anthony McGillion, RN, CritCareCert, BEd; Aidan Mulcahy, RN, BPhil, GDTD
[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Pressure ulcers (PUs) are an international patient safety problem that is largely preventable and increasingly recognized as a quality indicator of care. The impact of pressure ulcers is felt by the individual and health service affected, as well as the wider community. State-wide public hospital programs have been implemented to address the unacceptable prevalence rates in Victoria from 26.5% in 2003 to 17.6% in 2006. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a multi-faceted pressure ulcer prevention strategy in reducing the prevalence rate at an Australian private health service. The study used a pre and post test design. Point prevalence surveys were conducted in June 2006 (N=370) and again August 2008 (N=406) following the implementation of a multi-faceted strategy. The strategy consisted of marketing the impact and extent of the problem, nursing education to improve knowledge, organizational processes to identify patients admitted with PUs, those at risk and management plans, and organizational resources to assist staff and patients. The results showed the prevalence of hospital-acquired PUs significantly decreased from 20.6% in 2006 to 11.5% in 2008(p=0.0035) following the implementation strategy. There was increased documentation of risk assessment from 65.3% to 75.9% in 2008(p=0.0065). Of those who developed PUs, although not significant, there was increased documentation of management plans from 21.1% to 37% in 2008(p=0.1060). Although significant improvement could not be isolated to one specific intervention, the multi-faceted approach was selected to incorporate: various dissemination methods to raise awareness of resources and evidence-based practices; multiple educational learning styles and; system changes to improve processes. This approach has been shown to be consistently effective in systematic reviews of the research evidence and was reinforced in this study. Ongoing audit and staff feedback are critical to improving the quality of nursing care and patient safety.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of a Multi-Faceted Nursing Strategy to Prevent Pressure Ulcers and Improve Patient Safetyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155173-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implementation of a Multi-Faceted Nursing Strategy to Prevent Pressure Ulcers and Improve Patient Safety</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bucknall, Tracey, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cabrini Health</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tracey.bucknall@deakin.edu.au</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Helen Forbes, RN, PhD; Caroline Nicolas, BA(Hons); Yvette Gomez, RN, GCPallCare, GDCounsPsychotherapy, GDTD, MPET; Anthony McGillion, RN, CritCareCert, BEd; Aidan Mulcahy, RN, BPhil, GDTD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Pressure ulcers (PUs) are an international patient safety problem that is largely preventable and increasingly recognized as a quality indicator of care. The impact of pressure ulcers is felt by the individual and health service affected,&nbsp;as well as the&nbsp;wider community. State-wide public hospital programs have been implemented to address the unacceptable prevalence rates in Victoria from 26.5% in 2003 to 17.6% in 2006. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a multi-faceted pressure ulcer prevention strategy in reducing the prevalence rate at an Australian private health service. The study used a pre and post test design. Point prevalence surveys were conducted in June 2006 (N=370) and again August 2008 (N=406) following the implementation of a multi-faceted strategy. The strategy consisted of marketing the impact and extent of the problem, nursing education to improve knowledge, organizational processes to identify patients admitted with PUs, those at risk and management plans, and organizational resources to assist staff and patients. The results showed the prevalence of hospital-acquired PUs significantly decreased from 20.6% in 2006 to 11.5% in 2008(p=0.0035) following the implementation strategy. There was increased documentation of risk assessment from 65.3% to 75.9% in 2008(p=0.0065). Of those who developed PUs, although not significant, there was increased documentation of management plans from 21.1% to 37% in 2008(p=0.1060). Although significant improvement could not be isolated to one specific intervention, the multi-faceted approach was selected to incorporate: various dissemination methods to raise awareness of resources and evidence-based practices; multiple educational learning styles and; system changes to improve processes. This approach has been shown to be consistently effective in systematic reviews of the research evidence and was reinforced in this study. Ongoing audit and staff feedback are critical to improving the quality of nursing care and patient safety.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:36:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:36:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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