2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155207
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects and Support of Healthcare Workers Exposed to Vicarious Trauma
Abstract:
The Effects and Support of Healthcare Workers Exposed to Vicarious Trauma
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hattingh, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Africa
Title:Associate Professor
[Research Presentation] Traumatic events occur and affect people during their lifetime. Trauma may be the result of psychological events such as violence, for example being abused. Trauma can also be of a physical nature, e.g., learning that one has a terminal disease, finding out about a positive HIV status. The traumatised individual often seeks the assistance of nurses, to help them cope with traumatic experiences. Traumatised peopleÆs friends/family often discourages them from articulating their experiences, as it is too distressing for them to hear. Nurses, who are exposed to others' trauma in their daily work, are often traumatised and overburdened by narratives and events that happened to others and they will give meaning to traumatic events depending on how they as individuals experience them. Interpretations of traumatic events can result in nurses' experiencing changes in the way they view themselves, others and their world. "Vicarious trauma" describes the disruptions in cognitive schemas (i.e., core beliefs about self, others and the world) and behaviour changes experienced by nurses who treat the traumatised. Vicarious trauma is an occupational hazard for all those who care for and support trauma survivors. Nurses experiencing vicarious trauma begin to see the world through "trauma lenses" and continuous exposure to trauma survivors sustains this view. The focus is usually on the effects of trauma on the primary victims and not on those who care for and support them (secondary victims). Because secondary victims are not directly involved in the traumatic event, their distress often goes undetected. The effects of vicarious trauma experienced by nurses need to be understood in the context of the work environment. Nurses, who render services to traumatised individuals, often become the victims of trauma themselves. It is thus imperative to ensure that psychological support services are developed to assist nurses to deal with trauma.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects and Support of Healthcare Workers Exposed to Vicarious Traumaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155207-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects and Support of Healthcare Workers Exposed to Vicarious Trauma</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hattingh, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Africa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hattisp@unisa.ac.za</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Traumatic events occur and affect people during their lifetime. Trauma may be the result of psychological events such as violence, for example being abused. Trauma can also be of a physical nature, e.g., learning that one has a terminal disease, finding out about a positive HIV status. The traumatised individual often seeks the assistance of nurses, to help them cope with traumatic experiences. Traumatised people&AElig;s friends/family often discourages them from articulating their experiences, as it is too distressing for them to hear. Nurses, who are exposed to others' trauma in their daily work, are often traumatised and overburdened by narratives and events that happened to others and they will give meaning to traumatic events depending on how they as individuals experience them. Interpretations of traumatic events can result in nurses' experiencing changes in the way they view themselves, others and their world. &quot;Vicarious trauma&quot; describes the disruptions in cognitive schemas (i.e., core beliefs about self, others and the world) and behaviour changes experienced by nurses who treat the traumatised. Vicarious trauma is an occupational hazard for all those who care for and support trauma survivors. Nurses experiencing vicarious trauma begin to see the world through &quot;trauma lenses&quot; and continuous exposure to trauma survivors sustains this view. The focus is usually on the effects of trauma on the primary victims and not on those who care for and support them (secondary victims). Because secondary victims are not directly involved in the traumatic event, their distress often goes undetected. The effects of vicarious trauma experienced by nurses need to be understood in the context of the work environment. Nurses, who render services to traumatised individuals, often become the victims of trauma themselves. It is thus imperative to ensure that psychological support services are developed to assist nurses to deal with trauma.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:38:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:38:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.