2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155213
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural influences on end of life decisions
Abstract:
Cultural influences on end of life decisions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Houghton, Douglas, MSN, ARNP, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Jackson Health System
Title:Nurse Practitioner
[Symposium Presentation] Cultural background plays an important role in the choices that patients and families make when faced with important health care or life support decisions.áCultural influences include ethnicity, language spoken, customs, shared beliefs, and religion and spirituality dimensions.áWhile broad generalizations about cultural influencesáon care do not necessarily apply to individual decisions, understanding some commonly held beliefs or common practices within a culture may help providers from outside the cultural group to deliver more culturally appropriate care in a manner acceptable to the patient/family.áThis presentation will review the evidence in the area of culturalápreferences and beliefs governing end of life care, with an emphasis on the decision-making process commonly used within various cultures.áPreferences for life support within the critical care setting will be an area of emphasis, as this clinical area is one in which patients are frequently not able to participate in the decision-making process. In the ICU, decisions areácommonly negotiated between surrogates/family and the physician, or simply made for the patient by the physician. Ethical dilemmas and conflictáare frequent in this setting, especially when providers come from a different cultural background than that of the patient/family/surrogate.áPreferences for autonomy in decision-makingáwithin various cultural groups will be discussed, as some cultures commonly use aáshared decision-making model, in which individual preferences are less important than the needs and the desires of the group or family as a whole.áUnderstanding this and similar concepts requires a major shift in perspective for providers from most Western cultures, where individual preference and autonomy in decision-making are commonly held values.áSpirituality and religious issues will be another strong thread within the presentation, as these issues areáhighly relevantáto end of life care decisions in most cultural groups. Belief in miracles,áGod,áor the wonders of modernátechnology can profoundly affect how patients and families make decisions regarding their care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural influences on end of life decisionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155213-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural influences on end of life decisions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Houghton, Douglas, MSN, ARNP, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Jackson Health System</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dhoughton@um-jmh.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium Presentation] Cultural background plays an important role in the choices that patients and families make when faced with important health care or life support decisions.&aacute;Cultural influences include ethnicity, language spoken, customs, shared beliefs, and religion and spirituality dimensions.&aacute;While broad generalizations about cultural influences&aacute;on care do not necessarily apply to individual decisions, understanding some commonly held beliefs or common practices within a culture may help providers from outside the cultural group to deliver more culturally appropriate care in a manner acceptable to the patient/family.&aacute;This presentation will review the evidence in the area of cultural&aacute;preferences and beliefs governing end of life care, with an emphasis on the decision-making process commonly used within various cultures.&aacute;Preferences for life support within the critical care setting will be an area of emphasis, as this clinical area is one in which patients are frequently not able to participate in the decision-making process. In the ICU, decisions are&aacute;commonly negotiated between surrogates/family and the physician, or simply made for the patient by the physician. Ethical dilemmas and conflict&aacute;are frequent in this setting, especially when providers come from a different cultural background than that of the patient/family/surrogate.&aacute;Preferences for autonomy in decision-making&aacute;within various cultural groups will be discussed, as some cultures commonly use a&aacute;shared decision-making model, in which individual preferences are less important than the needs and the desires of the group or family as a whole.&aacute;Understanding this and similar concepts requires a major shift in perspective for providers from most Western cultures, where individual preference and autonomy in decision-making are commonly held values.&aacute;Spirituality and religious issues will be another strong thread within the presentation, as these issues are&aacute;highly relevant&aacute;to end of life care decisions in most cultural groups. Belief in miracles,&aacute;God,&aacute;or the wonders of modern&aacute;technology can profoundly affect how patients and families make decisions regarding their care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:38:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:38:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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