2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155239
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship of Marginality, Abuse and PTSD Scores in Women
Abstract:
The Relationship of Marginality, Abuse and PTSD Scores in Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Koci, Anne Floyd, PhD, APRN-BC, cFNP, WHNP
P.I. Institution Name:Georgia State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Ora Strickland, PhD, RN, FAAN and David Cantor, PhD
[Research Presentation] From birth, women are a marginalized population vulnerable to abuse. Physical and sexual abuse adversely affects women's health.áAdverse long-term health outcomes associated with a history of abuse include, but are not limited to, anxiety, depression, and perimenstrual symptoms. Recent research suggests that abused women also suffer PTSD.áResearch is lacking regarding the relationship of marginality, abuse and PTSD. Purpose: To examine the relationship between marginality, abuse (physical and/or sexual abuse), and health outcomes of anxiety, depression and PTSD scores in women.áMethods: A secondary analysis of 568 healthy women (35% minorities) from the community who had participated in a study of PMS. Women with chronic diseases, diagnosed physical or psychological problems, and who were on birth control pills were excluded. Childhood, adolescent and adult abuse history data were obtained. All participants completed a MMPI- 2. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and Pearson and Spearman correlations were computed. Findings: Significant relationships between abuse and PTSD resulted (p<.01). PTSD had a strong, significant correlation with anxiety, depression, and marginality. Marginality and PTSD had significant positive correlations with physical, sexual and abuse across the lifespan and PMS. Women without a history of physical and/or sexual abuse had significantly lower mean PTSD scores than abused women. PTSD scores increased as marginality increased. Discussion: Health, both physical and mental health, is adversely impacted by abuse. Abuse and the resulting adverse health outcomes may encourage this vulnerable population to be further marginalized, further distanced from the decision-making center of society. Marginalized women are at higher risk for abuse and PTSD. (Funded by NIH Grant No. R01-NR02705.)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship of Marginality, Abuse and PTSD Scores in Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155239-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship of Marginality, Abuse and PTSD Scores in Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Koci, Anne Floyd, PhD, APRN-BC, cFNP, WHNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgia State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">akoci1@gsu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ora Strickland, PhD, RN, FAAN and David Cantor, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] From birth, women are a marginalized population vulnerable to abuse. Physical and sexual abuse adversely affects women's health.&aacute;Adverse long-term health outcomes associated with a history of abuse include, but are not limited to, anxiety, depression, and perimenstrual symptoms. Recent research suggests that abused women also suffer PTSD.&aacute;Research is lacking regarding the relationship of marginality, abuse and PTSD. Purpose: To examine the relationship between marginality, abuse (physical and/or sexual abuse), and health outcomes of anxiety, depression and PTSD scores in women.&aacute;Methods: A secondary analysis of 568 healthy women (35% minorities) from the community who had participated in a study of PMS. Women with chronic diseases, diagnosed physical or psychological problems, and who were on birth control pills were excluded. Childhood, adolescent and adult abuse history data were obtained. All participants completed a MMPI- 2. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and Pearson and Spearman correlations were computed. Findings: Significant relationships between abuse and PTSD resulted (p&lt;.01). PTSD had a strong, significant correlation with anxiety, depression, and marginality. Marginality and PTSD had significant positive correlations with physical, sexual and abuse across the lifespan and PMS. Women without a history of physical and/or sexual abuse had significantly lower mean PTSD scores than abused women. PTSD scores increased as marginality increased. Discussion: Health, both physical and mental health, is adversely impacted by abuse. Abuse and the resulting adverse health outcomes may encourage this vulnerable population to be further marginalized, further distanced from the decision-making center of society. Marginalized women are at higher risk for abuse and PTSD. (Funded by NIH Grant No. R01-NR02705.)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:39:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:39:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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