Comparing risk factors between African American mothers who deliver a term infant with African American mothers who deliver a preterm infant

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155255
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparing risk factors between African American mothers who deliver a term infant with African American mothers who deliver a preterm infant
Abstract:
Comparing risk factors between African American mothers who deliver a term infant with African American mothers who deliver a preterm infant
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Lutenbacher, Melanie, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Vanderbilt University
Title:Associate Professor & Director, PhD in Nursing Science Program
Co-Authors:Patricia Temple, MD, MPH; William Walsh, MD; Mary Dietrich, PhD and Sharon Karp, MSN, CPNP
[Research Presentation] Premature births (PTB) remain a global issue. Associated maternal socio-biological risk factors and disparities among racial groups have been identified but little is known about the differences in the distribution of risk factors within some racial groups. Weácompared the frequency and distribution of factors associated with PTB in a sample of African American (AA) mothers who delivered a term infant (n = 174) and a sample of AA mothers who delivered a preterm infant (< 37 weeks gestation; n = 78). Women (n = 252) were recruited from post partum units in a large urban U.S. medical center between 1 and 3 days postpartum and interviewed by study personnel per approved institutional review board protocols. Maternal age ranged from 18 to 41 years (mean = 24.6, SD = 5.6). Most mothers (74%) had at least a high school education, had never been married (74%), did not plan the recent pregnancy (77%), had at least one prior pregnancy (73%), and had insurance coverage with the state Medicaid program (76%). More than half of the total sample (55%) reported high depressive symptoms with 63% of the preterm mothers having CES-D scores (cubes) 16. Mothers with PTB were more likely to have had a prior preterm birth (57%) than mothers who delivered a term infant (26%). Mothers with a PTB were also more likely to be unmarried and younger, to report higher family stress, more cigarette usage, and incomes that were never enough to meet expenses. This study adds to the growing body of knowledge about the distribution of socio-biological factors in African American mothers. Many risk factors are potentially malleable yet few mothers reported receiving related services. Targeted interventions to meet the needs of African American mothers are not available. More work related to the development of culturally sensitive interventions is needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparing risk factors between African American mothers who deliver a term infant with African American mothers who deliver a preterm infanten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155255-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparing risk factors between African American mothers who deliver a term infant with African American mothers who deliver a preterm infant</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lutenbacher, Melanie, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Vanderbilt University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor &amp; Director, PhD in Nursing Science Program</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">melanie.lutenbacher@vanderbilt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia Temple, MD, MPH; William Walsh, MD; Mary Dietrich, PhD and Sharon Karp, MSN, CPNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Premature births (PTB) remain a global issue. Associated maternal socio-biological risk factors and disparities among racial groups have been identified but little is known about the differences in the distribution of risk factors within some racial groups. We&aacute;compared the frequency and distribution of factors associated with PTB in a sample of African American (AA) mothers who delivered a term infant (n = 174) and a sample of AA mothers who delivered a preterm infant (&lt; 37 weeks gestation; n = 78). Women (n = 252) were recruited from post partum units in a large urban U.S. medical center between 1 and 3 days postpartum and interviewed by study personnel per approved institutional review board protocols. Maternal age ranged from 18 to 41 years (mean = 24.6, SD = 5.6). Most mothers (74%) had at least a high school education, had never been married (74%), did not plan the recent pregnancy (77%), had at least one prior pregnancy (73%), and had insurance coverage with the state Medicaid program (76%). More than half of the total sample (55%) reported high depressive symptoms with 63% of the preterm mothers having CES-D scores (cubes) 16. Mothers with PTB were more likely to have had a prior preterm birth (57%) than mothers who delivered a term infant (26%). Mothers with a PTB were also more likely to be unmarried and younger, to report higher family stress, more cigarette usage, and incomes that were never enough to meet expenses. This study adds to the growing body of knowledge about the distribution of socio-biological factors in African American mothers. Many risk factors are potentially malleable yet few mothers reported receiving related services. Targeted interventions to meet the needs of African American mothers are not available. More work related to the development of culturally sensitive interventions is needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:40:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:40:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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