The Effect of a Nutrition Education Program on Nicaraguan Adolescent Girls and their Mothers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155264
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of a Nutrition Education Program on Nicaraguan Adolescent Girls and their Mothers
Abstract:
The Effect of a Nutrition Education Program on Nicaraguan Adolescent Girls and their Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Moore, Jean B., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:George Mason University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Lisa Pawloski, PhD
[Research Presentation] In this study the researchers sought to improve the nutritional status of adolescent girls in Nicaragua by providing a nutrition education intervention to girls and their mothers.áThe purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a nutrition education program on the nutrition knowledge, self-care practices, hemoglobin levels, and nutrition status of Nicaraguan adolescent girls and the nutritional knowledge and dependent-care behavior of their mothers.áSuch research is necessary because girls in Nicaragua are at risk for poor nutrition, have been shown to have compromised growth, are at risk for anemia, and face future pregnancies. This longitudinal study employed a mixed quantitative/qualitative design to study the impact of the nutrition education program. A pre-experimental design was used to determine the effect of the intervention on knowledge, practice, hemoglobin, and status. A qualitative approach was used to explore what factors kept girls and mothers from changing self-care practices.áThe setting for the study was a nursing center, run by nurses from a university school of nursing, in a barrio in Managua, Nicaragua. áData were collected from a non-probability sample of 182 adolescent girls over a four-year period and from 67 of their mothers over a two-year period in Managua, Nicaragua. The three-year nutrition education program consisted of the implementation of four nutrition education classes delivered every three months over a three-year period for girls (12 classes) and over a two-year period for mothers (8 classes).á In most cases, pretest-posttest comparisons indicated that girls' and mothers' knowledge of nutrition increased as a result of the nutrition education program. The nutrition practices of both girls and mothers improved as well. The findings on nutrition status improvement were somewhat mixed. No significant improvement was found for hemoglobin levels, but factors that significantly influenced this variable were identified.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of a Nutrition Education Program on Nicaraguan Adolescent Girls and their Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155264-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of a Nutrition Education Program on Nicaraguan Adolescent Girls and their Mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moore, Jean B., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">George Mason University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmoore@gmu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lisa Pawloski, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] In this study the researchers sought to improve the nutritional status of adolescent girls in Nicaragua by providing a nutrition education intervention to girls and their mothers.&aacute;The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a nutrition education program on the nutrition knowledge, self-care practices, hemoglobin levels, and nutrition status of Nicaraguan adolescent girls and the nutritional knowledge and dependent-care behavior of their mothers.&aacute;Such research is necessary because girls in Nicaragua are at risk for poor nutrition, have been shown to have compromised growth, are at risk for anemia, and face future pregnancies. This longitudinal study employed a mixed quantitative/qualitative design to study the impact of the nutrition education program. A pre-experimental design was used to determine the effect of the intervention on knowledge, practice, hemoglobin, and status. A qualitative approach was used to explore what factors kept girls and mothers from changing self-care practices.&aacute;The setting for the study was a nursing center, run by nurses from a university school of nursing, in a barrio in Managua, Nicaragua. &aacute;Data were collected from a non-probability sample of 182 adolescent girls over a four-year period and from 67 of their mothers over a two-year period in Managua, Nicaragua. The three-year nutrition education program consisted of the implementation of four nutrition education classes delivered every three months over a three-year period for girls (12 classes) and over a two-year period for mothers (8 classes).&aacute; In most cases, pretest-posttest comparisons indicated that girls' and mothers' knowledge of nutrition increased as a result of the nutrition education program. The nutrition practices of both girls and mothers improved as well. The findings on nutrition status improvement were somewhat mixed. No significant improvement was found for hemoglobin levels, but factors that significantly influenced this variable were identified.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:41:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:41:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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