Predictors of Depressive Symptoms in Older Rural Couples: Actor-Partner Interaction Model

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155279
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of Depressive Symptoms in Older Rural Couples: Actor-Partner Interaction Model
Abstract:
Predictors of Depressive Symptoms in Older Rural Couples: Actor-Partner Interaction Model
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Rayens, Mary Kay, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Deborah Reed, PhD, MSPH, RN and Mei Zhang, MSN, MPH, RN
[Evidence-based Presentation] Background:áAmong older farmers, depressive symptoms may be influenced by work patterns, satisfaction with work, stress, and health status. Couples may affect each other's depressive symptoms. Purpose: Determine whether depressive symptoms score is predicted by hours worked on the farm, satisfaction with work, number of health conditions, and perceived stress. Sample:á494 farm couples that participated in the baseline interview for a longitudinal study of older farmers. Most participants were either white (81%) or African American (18%). The mean age was 64.1 (SD = 7.9) with a range of 50 to 89. Method: Data from the husbands and wives were used together in a dyad-based regression model; the Actor-Partner Interaction model (APIM), and accounts for not only the respondent's values for each predictor variable in assessing the impact on the outcome variable (CES-D), but also the responses given to the same questionnaires by the respondent's spouse. Values for the predictors that are attributed to the respondent are the 'actor' effects; spouse responses are the 'partner' effects. Results: The significant actor effects in the APIM model included satisfaction with farm work, perceived stress and number of health conditions. Hours worked on the farm and perceived stress exhibited significant partner effects. Respondents who were more satisfied with farm work, had lower stress, and fewer health conditions had lower depressive symptoms scores. In addition, respondents whose partners reported they worked fewer hours on the farm and lower stress levels had lower CES-D scores than those whose partners were working more hours and were under more stress. Discussion: Rural dwellers may be at greater risk for high depressive symptoms than their urban counterparts. This study of older farm couples underscores the importance of stress management in both members of a couple, since the perceived duress of one member of the dyadáaffects both.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of Depressive Symptoms in Older Rural Couples: Actor-Partner Interaction Modelen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155279-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Predictors of Depressive Symptoms in Older Rural Couples: Actor-Partner Interaction Model</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rayens, Mary Kay, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkrayens@uky.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah Reed, PhD, MSPH, RN and Mei Zhang, MSN, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] Background:&aacute;Among older farmers, depressive symptoms may be influenced by work patterns, satisfaction with work, stress, and health status. Couples may affect each other's depressive symptoms. Purpose: Determine whether depressive symptoms score is predicted by hours worked on the farm, satisfaction with work, number of health conditions, and perceived stress. Sample:&aacute;494 farm couples that participated in the baseline interview for a longitudinal study of older farmers. Most participants were either white (81%) or African American (18%). The mean age was 64.1 (SD = 7.9) with a range of 50 to 89. Method: Data from the husbands and wives were used together in a dyad-based regression model; the Actor-Partner Interaction model (APIM), and accounts for not only the respondent's values for each predictor variable in assessing the impact on the outcome variable (CES-D), but also the responses given to the same questionnaires by the respondent's spouse. Values for the predictors that are attributed to the respondent are the 'actor' effects; spouse responses are the 'partner' effects. Results: The significant actor effects in the APIM model included satisfaction with farm work, perceived stress and number of health conditions. Hours worked on the farm and perceived stress exhibited significant partner effects. Respondents who were more satisfied with farm work, had lower stress, and fewer health conditions had lower depressive symptoms scores. In addition, respondents whose partners reported they worked fewer hours on the farm and lower stress levels had lower CES-D scores than those whose partners were working more hours and were under more stress. Discussion: Rural dwellers may be at greater risk for high depressive symptoms than their urban counterparts. This study of older farm couples underscores the importance of stress management in both members of a couple, since the perceived duress of one member of the dyad&aacute;affects both.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:41:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:41:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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