Employee Health Fair Data as Evidence for Designing Health Promotion Programs

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155311
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Employee Health Fair Data as Evidence for Designing Health Promotion Programs
Abstract:
Employee Health Fair Data as Evidence for Designing Health Promotion Programs
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Wynd, Christine A., RN, PhD, CNAA
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Akron
Title:Professor of Nursing
[Research Presentation] The purpose of this study was to assess health data of hospital employees in order to design future health promotion programs targeted to the desires and goals of participants. Hospital employees (N = 1295) participated in separate health fairs over a 3-year period and provided health profile data about actual health status, perceptions of health, health habits, and health needs. Height, weight, body mass index (BMI), self-reported ratings of stress, and metabolic screens for total cholesterol, high density lipoproteins (HDL), cholesterol/HDL ratios, blood sugar levels, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures constituted actual health status information.á Questionnaires elicited information about perceptions of health, health habits, and health needs. The Transtheoretical Model for Change (TTM) served as a framework for the study and stages of change helped determine readiness for health behavior modifications. Actual health status demonstrated significantly lower total cholesterol readings, higher HDL levels, and lower systolic blood pressures over the 3-year period. Average individual body weights and BMIs did not change significantly; however, a slightly higher percentage of individuals fell into overweight and obese categories. Perceptions of health increased significantly over time.á Prevalence of smoking remained at 15% across all three years while the average exercise rate increased slightly from 2.95 to 3.09 times per week. Seventy-four percent of employees reported feeling overweight and desired to lose an average of 32 pounds per individual; 51% of employees wanted to increase their daily physical activity levels.á Forty-seven percent of employees were in the action stage of the TTM and were ready to move toward full behavior change adoption and maintenance. Employee health data can provide evidence for designing health promotion programs and may serve as a foundation for future health planning. Currently, interventions are being planned to assist employees with full change adoption and maintenance of a weight control/exercise lifestyle.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmployee Health Fair Data as Evidence for Designing Health Promotion Programsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155311-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Employee Health Fair Data as Evidence for Designing Health Promotion Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wynd, Christine A., RN, PhD, CNAA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cwynd@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] The purpose of this study was to assess health data of hospital employees in order to design future health promotion programs targeted to the desires and goals of participants. Hospital employees (N = 1295) participated in separate health fairs over a 3-year period and provided health profile data about actual health status, perceptions of health, health habits, and health needs. Height, weight, body mass index (BMI), self-reported ratings of stress, and metabolic screens for total cholesterol, high density lipoproteins (HDL), cholesterol/HDL ratios, blood sugar levels, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures constituted actual health status information.&aacute; Questionnaires elicited information about perceptions of health, health habits, and health needs. The Transtheoretical Model for Change (TTM) served as a framework for the study and stages of change helped determine readiness for health behavior modifications. Actual health status demonstrated significantly lower total cholesterol readings, higher HDL levels, and lower systolic blood pressures over the 3-year period. Average individual body weights and BMIs did not change significantly; however, a slightly higher percentage of individuals fell into overweight and obese categories. Perceptions of health increased significantly over time.&aacute; Prevalence of smoking remained at 15% across all three years while the average exercise rate increased slightly from 2.95 to 3.09 times per week. Seventy-four percent of employees reported feeling overweight and desired to lose an average of 32 pounds per individual; 51% of employees wanted to increase their daily physical activity levels.&aacute; Forty-seven percent of employees were in the action stage of the TTM and were ready to move toward full behavior change adoption and maintenance. Employee health data can provide evidence for designing health promotion programs and may serve as a foundation for future health planning. Currently, interventions are being planned to assist employees with full change adoption and maintenance of a weight control/exercise lifestyle.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:43:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:43:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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