2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155327
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preventing, Delaying, or Reversing Retirement in Senior Nurses
Abstract:
Preventing, Delaying, or Reversing Retirement in Senior Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Landrum, Peggy A., PhD, RN, CS
P.I. Institution Name:Texas Woman's University
Title:Associate Clinical Professor
Nurse retention is a workplace priority as hospitals strive to address the nursing shortage.  Studies of new graduates indicate strategies for workplace changes that appeal to needs of the younger age cohort; few studies, however, have addressed factors important to senior nurses. This study investigated experienced nurses over age 50 to determine specific strategies that could influence them to remain in the workforce beyond traditional retirement age.  Quantitative means were used to gather information regarding preparation for retirement.  The analysis of qualitative interviews identified patterns in perceptions of senior nurses regarding work, retirement, and extraneous factors affecting their future.  Senior nurses in this study reported a desire to retire at age 61, with the actual intention of retiring at age 64. They describe increased workload that may decrease remaining time in the workforce by affecting physical safety and health. Some respondents reported responsibilities for care of a family member that affect their available time, social interactions, and physical health.  Family support and emotional burden were not problematic for this group. Motivating factors for continuing work past intended retirement dates were select aspects of work satisfaction, specific benefits, and flexibility in scheduling.  Nurse managers with specific skills are perceived as essential if hospitals expect to retain aging nurses; characteristics of a nurse-friendly environment that address individual and organizational needs are linked to improved morale and increased retention rates. Barriers to working part-time or full-time past contemplated retirement dates were 12-hour shifts, continued physical capacity for work, and access to adequate assistance with tasks. Major recommendations are: alternative length of shifts; patient-lifting safety policies; creative benefit plans; and, innovative management strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreventing, Delaying, or Reversing Retirement in Senior Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155327-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preventing, Delaying, or Reversing Retirement in Senior Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Landrum, Peggy A., PhD, RN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Texas Woman's University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Clinical Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">plandrum@mail.twu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurse retention is a workplace priority as hospitals strive to address the nursing shortage.&nbsp; Studies of new graduates indicate strategies for workplace changes that appeal to needs of the younger age cohort; few studies, however, have addressed factors important to senior nurses. This study investigated experienced nurses over age 50 to determine specific strategies that could influence them to remain in the workforce beyond traditional retirement age.&nbsp; Quantitative means were used to gather information regarding preparation for retirement.&nbsp; The analysis of qualitative interviews identified patterns in perceptions of senior nurses regarding work, retirement, and extraneous factors affecting their future.&nbsp; Senior nurses in this study reported a desire to retire at age 61, with the actual intention of retiring at age 64. They describe increased workload that may decrease remaining time in the workforce by affecting physical safety and health. Some respondents reported responsibilities for care of a family member that affect their available time, social interactions, and physical health.&nbsp; Family support and emotional burden were not problematic for this group. Motivating factors for continuing work past intended retirement dates were select aspects of work satisfaction, specific benefits, and flexibility in scheduling. &nbsp;Nurse managers with specific skills are perceived as essential if hospitals expect to retain aging nurses; characteristics of a nurse-friendly environment that address individual and organizational needs are linked to improved morale and increased retention rates. Barriers to working part-time or full-time past contemplated retirement dates were 12-hour shifts, continued physical capacity for work, and access to adequate assistance with tasks. Major recommendations are: alternative length of shifts; patient-lifting safety policies; creative benefit plans; and, innovative management strategies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:44:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:44:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.