The Relationship of Hardiness and Health-Promoting Behaviors in Breast Cancer Survivors and their First Degree Relatives

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155350
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship of Hardiness and Health-Promoting Behaviors in Breast Cancer Survivors and their First Degree Relatives
Abstract:
The Relationship of Hardiness and Health-Promoting Behaviors in Breast Cancer Survivors and their First Degree Relatives
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Nikou, Victoria Rizzo, PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Herbert H. Lehman College of City University of New York
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective:  to investigate the relationships between hardiness and health-promoting behaviors in breast cancer survivors and their first degree female relatives. Design: exploratory correlational quantitative design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 65 female participants; 35 were breast cancer survivors and 30 were first degree relatives of breast cancer survivors, ages 18 to 76+; voluntarily solicited for this pilot study; and years of survival ranged from one to twenty-five. Concept or Variables Studied Together: Pender?s Health-Promotion model and Kobasa-Oulette?s hardiness model. Methods: Instrumentation included the Personal Views Survey (PVS), the Health-Promotion Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP II) and demographic data form; analyses of means, medians, and standard deviations for age and instrument scores, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients, and multiple regression analyses. Findings: Hardiness was positively related to health-promoting behaviors; this was supported at the p<.001 level.  Health-promoting behaviors were similar for both breast cancer survivors and non-survivors. Conclusions: Hardiness was significantly correlated with health-promoting behaviors. Implications: The identification of a stress-resistant personality factor, hardiness, may be viewed as a predictor of health-promoting behaviors in this population of female breast cancer survivors and their ?at risk? relatives.  This study is significant to nursing education and practice since these results may serve to guide curriculum development for client education programs with emphasis on the specific needs of an identified ?at risk? group.  Results of this study would assist the nurse educator to teach specific lifestyle interventions to nurses, nursing students and health care providers who are working in the specialty area of women?s health.  Some topical areas include how to increase daily exercise, promote healthy diets, promote positive feelings about themselves, obtain support, decrease and manage stress, and take health responsibility.  These interventions will promote improved health outcomes for all women with particular emphasis on the women whose lives have been impacted by a diagnosis of cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship of Hardiness and Health-Promoting Behaviors in Breast Cancer Survivors and their First Degree Relativesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155350-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Relationship of Hardiness and Health-Promoting Behaviors in Breast Cancer Survivors and their First Degree Relatives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Nikou, Victoria Rizzo, PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Herbert H. Lehman College of City University of New York</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Victoria.rizzo-nikou@Lehman.cuny.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective:&nbsp; to investigate the relationships between hardiness and health-promoting behaviors in breast cancer survivors and their first degree female relatives. Design:&nbsp;exploratory correlational quantitative design. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 65 female participants; 35 were breast cancer survivors and 30 were first degree relatives of breast cancer survivors, ages 18 to 76+; voluntarily solicited for this pilot study; and years of survival ranged from one to twenty-five. Concept or Variables Studied Together:&nbsp;Pender?s Health-Promotion model and Kobasa-Oulette?s hardiness model. Methods:&nbsp;Instrumentation included the Personal Views Survey (PVS), the Health-Promotion Lifestyle Profile II (HPLP II) and demographic data form; analyses of means, medians, and standard deviations for age and instrument scores, Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients, and multiple regression analyses. Findings:&nbsp;Hardiness was positively related to health-promoting behaviors; this was supported at the p&lt;.001 level. &nbsp;Health-promoting behaviors were similar for both breast cancer survivors and non-survivors. Conclusions:&nbsp;Hardiness was significantly correlated with health-promoting behaviors. Implications:&nbsp;The identification of a stress-resistant personality factor, hardiness, may be viewed as a predictor of health-promoting behaviors in this population of female breast cancer survivors and their ?at risk? relatives.&nbsp; This study is significant to nursing education and practice since these results may serve to guide curriculum development for client education programs with emphasis on the specific needs of an identified ?at risk? group.&nbsp; Results of this study would assist the nurse educator to teach specific lifestyle interventions to nurses, nursing students and health care providers who are working in the specialty area of women?s health.&nbsp; Some topical areas include how to increase daily exercise, promote healthy diets, promote positive feelings about themselves, obtain support, decrease and manage stress, and take health responsibility.&nbsp; These interventions will promote improved health outcomes for all women with particular emphasis on the women whose lives have been impacted by a diagnosis of cancer.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:45:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:45:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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