2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155361
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Moral Distress Among Nursing Students
Abstract:
Moral Distress Among Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Roberts, Rochelle, BA, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Mount Saint Mary College
Title:Instructor of Nursing
Co-Authors:Sharon K. Holmberg, PhD, RN
There is limited research in how nursing students experience moral distress as developing professional nurses.  A descriptive, quantitative design using the Moral Distress Scale (MDS) consisted of 38 items reflecting stressful, ambiguous nursing care situations, which call for moral or ethical judgments.  The MDS tool, which consisted of 38 items reflecting stressful, ambiguous nursing care situations, has demonstrated good reliability and validity.  The study compared the experience of moral distress between student nurses and practicing nurses based on Jameton?s conceptualization of moral distress and the principles of biomedical ethics.  A 7-point Likert scale (0-6) was used with a higher score indicating greater moral distress.  Results:  Overall, participants experienced moderately high levels of moral distress.  The item with the highest mean score was ?being required to care for patients one is not competent to care for.?  Previous research indicated that practicing nurses also experienced moderately high levels of moral distress.  Practicing nurses considered understaffing as their most serious ethical concern.  In contrast, nursing students were most concerned about incompetent caregiving, whether given by themselves, practicing nurses, physicians, or other health personnel.  These findings support implications for nursing curriculum that include peer and faculty guidance, teaching positive coping strategies, identifying effective role models and developing collaborative relationships.  Creating opportunities to reflect and explore experiences in the clinical arena can facilitate nursing students? ability to evaluate difficult ethical dilemmas.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMoral Distress Among Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155361-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Moral Distress Among Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roberts, Rochelle, BA, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Mount Saint Mary College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shelliir@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sharon K. Holmberg, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There is limited research in how nursing students experience moral distress as developing professional nurses.&nbsp; A descriptive, quantitative design using the Moral Distress Scale (MDS) consisted of 38 items reflecting stressful, ambiguous nursing care situations, which call for moral or ethical judgments.&nbsp; The MDS tool, which consisted of 38 items reflecting stressful, ambiguous nursing care situations, has demonstrated good reliability and validity.&nbsp; The study compared the experience of moral distress between student nurses and practicing nurses based on Jameton?s conceptualization of moral distress and the principles of biomedical ethics.&nbsp; A 7-point Likert scale (0-6) was used with a higher score indicating greater moral distress.&nbsp; Results:&nbsp; Overall, participants experienced moderately high levels of moral distress.&nbsp; The item with the highest mean score was ?being required to care for patients one is not competent to care for.?&nbsp; Previous research indicated that practicing nurses also experienced moderately high levels of moral distress.&nbsp; Practicing nurses considered understaffing as their most serious ethical concern.&nbsp; In contrast, nursing students were most concerned about incompetent caregiving, whether given by themselves, practicing nurses, physicians, or other health personnel.&nbsp; These findings support implications for nursing curriculum that include peer and faculty guidance, teaching positive coping strategies, identifying effective role models and developing collaborative relationships.&nbsp; Creating opportunities to reflect and explore experiences in the clinical arena can facilitate nursing students? ability to evaluate difficult ethical dilemmas.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:46:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:46:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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