The Effects of Music Therapy Sessions on Various Outcomes in Mechanically Ventilated ICU Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155365
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Music Therapy Sessions on Various Outcomes in Mechanically Ventilated ICU Patients
Abstract:
The Effects of Music Therapy Sessions on Various Outcomes in Mechanically Ventilated ICU Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Sabatini, Roxanne, RN, BSN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Morristown Memorial Hospital
Title:Unit Educator
Purpose: Mechanically ventilated Critical Care patients are under great stress.  One adjunctive treatment that can be effective for allaying anxiety and promoting relaxation is music therapy.  The study explored the effects of music on mechanically ventilated ICU patients.  Background/Significance: Multiple studies have shown that music can reduce heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rates.  Methods: The randomized controlled clinical trial utilized a repeated measures three-group design.  A convenient sample of 24 mechanically ventilated ICU patients, matched for Apache II scores, were recruited after informed consent was obtained.  The eligible participants were randomly assigned by permuted block method to one of three experimental groups (Classical, New Age, or no music).  All groups wore foam-padded headphones for the 30 minutes of data collection.  ?Music? or ?No Music? data collection was continued for 30 minutes twice daily.  Results: Data analysis of 43 patients revealed reductions in all clinical measures in trial arm B (New-Age) in the first and second sessions.  Trial arm B had the largest reductions in all parameters, except heart rate, in the first session data.  The largest changes in mean heart rate occurred in trial arm A (No Music, -5.6) in session one, but an increase in heart rate was seen in session two for trial arm A (+3.36).   The largest reductions in blood pressure occurred in both of the music listening groups trial arms A and B in the second session.  Conclusions: The results may support the use of music for relaxation along with noise and stimulation reduction for patients in critical care.  The different responses between the first and second sessions may be due to the true experimental nature of the first session.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Music Therapy Sessions on Various Outcomes in Mechanically Ventilated ICU Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155365-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Music Therapy Sessions on Various Outcomes in Mechanically Ventilated ICU Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sabatini, Roxanne, RN, BSN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Morristown Memorial Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Unit Educator</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">roxysab@earthlink.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Mechanically ventilated Critical Care patients are under great stress.&nbsp; One adjunctive treatment that can be effective for allaying anxiety and promoting relaxation is music therapy.&nbsp; The study explored the effects of music on mechanically ventilated ICU patients.&nbsp; Background/Significance: Multiple studies have shown that music can reduce heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rates.&nbsp; Methods: The randomized controlled clinical trial utilized a repeated measures three-group design.&nbsp; A convenient sample of 24 mechanically ventilated ICU patients, matched for Apache II scores, were recruited after informed consent was obtained.&nbsp; The eligible participants were randomly assigned by permuted block method to one of three experimental groups (Classical, New Age, or no music).&nbsp; All groups wore foam-padded headphones for the 30 minutes of data collection.&nbsp; ?Music? or ?No Music? data collection was continued for 30 minutes twice daily.&nbsp; Results: Data analysis of 43 patients revealed reductions in all clinical measures in trial arm B (New-Age) in the first and second sessions.&nbsp; Trial arm B had the largest reductions in all parameters, except heart rate, in the first session data.&nbsp; The largest changes in mean heart rate occurred in trial arm A (No Music, -5.6) in session one, but an increase in heart rate was seen in session two for trial arm A (+3.36).&nbsp;&nbsp; The largest reductions in blood pressure occurred in both of the music listening groups trial arms A and B in the second session.&nbsp; Conclusions: The results may support the use of music for relaxation along with noise and stimulation reduction for patients in critical care.&nbsp; The different responses between the first and second sessions may be due to the true experimental nature of the first session.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:46:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:46:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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