2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155399
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emerging Trends: Barriers to Disaster Preparedness and the Human Element
Abstract:
Emerging Trends: Barriers to Disaster Preparedness and the Human Element
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Young, Charlotte, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Arkansas State University
Title:Professor of Nursing
Co-Authors:Deborah J. Persell, MSN, RN, CPNP
Although recent disasters are grim reminders of the importance of disaster/terrorism preparedness, human elements such as perceptions and concerns present barriers to professional readiness. This study used phenomenology to illuminate unsuspected links between concerns and disaster preparedness by health professionals in a southern state of the USA. This study followed up a larger study of health professionals (physicians, pharmacists, nurse practitioners and registered nurses.) Ten focus groups of health professionals responded to a semi-structured questionnaire approved by a panel of experts. The phenomenology method described by Reinharz and Carpenter and Schubert was used: 1) members were invited by letter providing an explanation of the research and the semi-structured questions to be asked within the focus group; 2) member responses were taped and transcribed, while keeping individual names anonymous; 3) immediate post group perceptions of the moderator and group observer were recorded and transcribed; 4) major categories were defined; 5) major themes and central issues were further identified and refined; 6) key respondents were contacted to verify findings; 7) results were included into the final report. Numerous barriers related to concerns for safety and professional competences were identified. For example, safety of self and family was an overwhelming issue related to the decision to participate as a responder.  Implications of this study suggest that human issues related to disaster preparedness should be addressed in community planning and education.  Potential solutions will be explored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmerging Trends: Barriers to Disaster Preparedness and the Human Elementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155399-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emerging Trends: Barriers to Disaster Preparedness and the Human Element</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Young, Charlotte, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arkansas State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cyoung@astate.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah J. Persell, MSN, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although recent disasters are grim reminders of the importance of disaster/terrorism preparedness, human elements such as perceptions and concerns present barriers to professional readiness. This study used phenomenology to illuminate unsuspected links between concerns and disaster preparedness by health professionals in a southern state of the USA. This study followed up a larger study of health professionals (physicians, pharmacists, nurse practitioners and registered nurses.) Ten focus groups of health professionals responded to a semi-structured questionnaire approved by a panel of experts. The phenomenology method described by Reinharz and Carpenter and Schubert was used: 1) members were invited by letter providing an explanation of the research and the semi-structured questions to be asked within the focus group; 2) member responses were taped and transcribed, while keeping individual names anonymous; 3) immediate post group perceptions of the moderator and group observer were recorded and transcribed; 4) major categories were defined; 5) major themes and central issues were further identified and refined; 6) key respondents were contacted to verify findings; 7) results were included into the final report. Numerous barriers related to concerns for safety and professional competences were identified. For example, safety of self and family was an overwhelming issue related to the decision to participate as a responder.&nbsp; Implications of this study suggest that human issues related to disaster preparedness should be addressed in community planning and education.&nbsp; Potential solutions will be explored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:48:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:48:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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