2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155405
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Smoking Cessation in Pregnant Women Utilizing Evidence-Based Interventions
Abstract:
Smoking Cessation in Pregnant Women Utilizing Evidence-Based Interventions
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Albrecht, Susan A., PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh
Title:Associate Dean and Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Judith A. Maloni, RN, PhD, FAAN
[Research Presentation] Approximately 20% to 35% of pregnant women smoke during pregnancy (Albrecht et al., 2004). Smoking is an important risk factor contributing to poor birth outcomes. There are many risk factors to reduce preterm births, the most beneficial effect is stopping or reducing smoking or tobacco use. Successful treatment of tobacco dependence can result in a 20% decrease in low birth weight babies, a 17% decrease in preterm births and an average increase in birthweight or 28 grams. Women who become pregnant are more likely to quit since they have an increased concern for their own health and for the health of their infants. This is especially true for moderate smokers smoking less than 20 cigarettes a day. The rate of cessation can be increased by 30% to 70% when evidence-based, pregnancy specific, smoking cessation interventions are implemented, compared to no intervention at all (Melvin, Dolan-Mullen, Windsor, Whiteside, & Goldenberg, 2000; Mullen, 1999). An evidence-based intervention known as the 5 A's approach consists of 5-15 minutes of brief counseling delivered by trained clinicians at each visit for women wishing to quit (ACOG, 1997; Melvin et al., 2000), and the 5 RÆs approach for women who are not interested in quitting (Fiore et al., 2000). Healthcare providers and systems have not consistently delivered appropriate smoking cessation interventions in the past. Therefore, the 5 A's approach can be utilized to improve cessation rates during pregnancy (Lancaster et al., 2002; USDHHS, 2000).The smoking status of women should be assessed at every healthcare encounter. By effectively training healthcare teams to intervene using the 5 A's and 5 R's approaches with pregnant smokers, positive healthcare outcomes will increase and costs reduced.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSmoking Cessation in Pregnant Women Utilizing Evidence-Based Interventionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155405-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Smoking Cessation in Pregnant Women Utilizing Evidence-Based Interventions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Albrecht, Susan A., PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean and Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">saa01@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judith A. Maloni, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Approximately 20% to 35% of pregnant women smoke during pregnancy (Albrecht et al., 2004). Smoking is an important risk factor contributing to poor birth outcomes. There are many risk factors to reduce preterm births, the most beneficial effect is stopping or reducing smoking or tobacco use. Successful treatment of tobacco dependence can result in a 20% decrease in low birth weight babies, a 17% decrease in preterm births and an average increase in birthweight or 28 grams. Women who become pregnant are more likely to quit since they have an increased concern for their own health and for the health of their infants. This is especially true for moderate smokers smoking less than 20 cigarettes a day. The rate of cessation can be increased by 30% to 70% when evidence-based, pregnancy specific, smoking cessation interventions are implemented, compared to no intervention at all (Melvin, Dolan-Mullen, Windsor, Whiteside, &amp; Goldenberg, 2000; Mullen, 1999). An evidence-based intervention known as the 5 A's approach consists of 5-15 minutes of brief counseling delivered by trained clinicians at each visit for women wishing to quit (ACOG, 1997; Melvin et al., 2000), and the 5 R&AElig;s approach for women who are not interested in quitting (Fiore et al., 2000). Healthcare providers and systems have not consistently delivered appropriate smoking cessation interventions in the past. Therefore, the 5 A's approach can be utilized to improve cessation rates during pregnancy (Lancaster et al., 2002; USDHHS, 2000).The smoking status of women should be assessed at every healthcare encounter. By effectively training healthcare teams to intervene using the 5 A's and 5 R's approaches with pregnant smokers, positive healthcare outcomes will increase and costs reduced.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:48:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:48:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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