Translating the Lessons Learned from Military Nursing Research to Civilian Disaster Response

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155422
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Translating the Lessons Learned from Military Nursing Research to Civilian Disaster Response
Abstract:
Translating the Lessons Learned from Military Nursing Research to Civilian Disaster Response
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Bridges, Elizabeth J., RN, PhD, CCNS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Washington School of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
[Symposium Presentation] Lessons learned from research related to military nursing care in unique and austere environments can be translated into civilian disaster response. Drawing on the characteristics of patients from current military operations and recent civilian natural disasters and the environment of care, demonstrate the use of a framework for identifying areas for nursing research. Examples of nursing research relevant to both patient populations will be highlighted to demonstrate the translation from military to civilian disaster response. For example, sudden cardiac arrests and myocardial infarctions increase after natural disasters. Loss of medical facilities will require the provision of acute care and resuscitation of cardiac arrest patients on field cots. Research related to the most effective method for the performance of resuscitation under conditions without a backboard will be presented. Secondary hypothermia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in trauma victims. During a disaster electricity may be unavailable. Research related to the use of light weight, portable devices to prevent hypothermia in trauma victims under austere conditions will be presented. Critical thinking abilities are crucial to being able to respond to unique care situations, such as man-made and natural disasters. Research related to the use of a human patient simulator to prepare nurses to provide care under austere conditions and the effectiveness of simulation training, as indicated by cognitive testing, clinical performance and critical thinking skills, will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTranslating the Lessons Learned from Military Nursing Research to Civilian Disaster Responseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155422-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Translating the Lessons Learned from Military Nursing Research to Civilian Disaster Response</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bridges, Elizabeth J., RN, PhD, CCNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Washington School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ebridges@u.washington.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Symposium Presentation] Lessons learned from research related to military nursing care in unique and austere environments can be translated into civilian disaster response. Drawing on the characteristics of patients from current military operations and recent civilian natural disasters and the environment of care, demonstrate the use of a framework for identifying areas for nursing research. Examples of nursing research relevant to both patient populations will be highlighted to demonstrate the translation from military to civilian disaster response. For example, sudden cardiac arrests and myocardial infarctions increase after natural disasters. Loss of medical facilities will require the provision of acute care and resuscitation of cardiac arrest patients on field cots. Research related to the most effective method for the performance of resuscitation under conditions without a backboard will be presented. Secondary hypothermia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in trauma victims. During a disaster electricity may be unavailable. Research related to the use of light weight, portable devices to prevent hypothermia in trauma victims under austere conditions will be presented. Critical thinking abilities are crucial to being able to respond to unique care situations, such as man-made and natural disasters. Research related to the use of a human patient simulator to prepare nurses to provide care under austere conditions and the effectiveness of simulation training, as indicated by cognitive testing, clinical performance and critical thinking skills, will be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T13:49:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T13:49:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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